GUIDE: QCinema International Film Festival 2019

Now on its seventh year, the QCinema International Film Festival will run from October 13 to 22 in select cinemas in Quezon City.

Venues

Trinoma, Gateway, Robinsons Galleria, Cinema ’76 Anonas, Cinema Centenario, and Cine Adarna at UP Diliman.

Ticket Information

Ticket price at mall venues (Trinoma, Gateway, Robinsons Galleria) is at 200 pesos per screening.

Ticket price at Cinema ’76 Anonas, Cinema Centenario, and Cine Adarna is 150 pesos per screening.

Screening Schedules

To keep updated on the latest screening schedules, please visit www.qcinema.ph/schedule.

Opening and Closing Film

Leading the roster are two much-awaited Asian titles. Sigrid Bernardo’s Untrue is QCinema’s opening film while Wet Season, by Singaporean director Anthony Chen, will officially close the festival.

Cristine Reyes and Xian Lim topbills the festival opener by Bernardo who is the director of the indie hit, Kita Kita. The Hooq-produced Wet Season is Chen’s follow-up to his critically-acclaimed film, Iloilo.

A Rising Wave

QCinema 2019 focuses on the strides Asian filmmakers have been making in world cinema, with Asian filmmakers bagging the Palme d’ Or award at the prestigious Cannes Film Festival for two consecutive years.  

Furthermore, the theme recognizes the growing number of women filmmakers participating in competitions for documentaries and short films. To add, this year’s QCinema sections have female-centric themes.

As one of the leading festivals in Southeast Asia, QCinema is the launching pad for the world premieres, not only for the three Filipino features in the Asian Next Wave competition, but also for new local shorts & documentaries, who all received grants from QCinema, where filmmakers own the rights to their films.

Local Film Grantees

QCinema recently relaunched its main competition, AsianNext Wave, to include three Filipino titles which each received a P1,500,000 seed grant: Arnel Barbarona’s Kaaway sa SulodBabae at Baril by Rae Red,and The Cleaners by Glenn Barit, which is his debut feature.

The QCShorts lineup features Judy Free by Jean Cheryl Tagyamon; Tokwifi by Carla Pulido Ocampo; Here, Here by Joanne Cesario; SPID by Alejo Barbaza and Mervine Aquino; Excuse Me, Miss, Miss, Miss by Sonny Calvento; and Isang Daa’t Isang Mariposa by Norvin De los Santos. The six filmmakers each received P200,000 production grants in the shorts competition.

Three new Filipino documentary features, recipients of post-production grants of P500,000 each, will premiere in the section, DocQC. They are For My Alien Friend (by Jet Leyco), A is for Agustin (Grace Pimentel Simbulan) and Spring by the Sea (Aleia Garcia).

International Selections

Five other films will showcase Asian talents at the Asian Next Wave.  These areNakorn-Sawan (by Puangsoi Aksornsawang, Thailand); Ave Maryam (Robby Ertanto, Indonesia); Fly By Night (Zahir Omar, Malaysia), The Long Walk (Mattie Do, Laos) and Suburban Birds (Sheng Qiu, China).

Most of the directors are slated to attend their gala screenings.

Three critically-acclaimed Asian docs round up the non-competitive documentary section with The Future Cries Beneath Our Soil (Pham Thu Hang, Vietnam); Talking About Trees (Suhaib Gasmelbari, Sudan) and Kabul, City in the Wind (Aboozar Amini, Afghanistan).

In Screen International, awarded titles from Cannes and Berlin will receive their Philippine premieres. They are  Beanpole (Kantemir Balagov); By The Grace of God (François Ozon); Nina Wu (Midi Z) ; Bacurau, (Kleber Mendonça Filho & Juliano Dornelles); Frankie (Ira Sachs), Synonyms (Nadav Lapid), The Whistlers (Corneliu Porumboiu), God Exists Her Name is Petrunya (Teona Mitevska), On A Magical Night (Christophe Honore) and High Life (Claire Denis).

The Special Screenings section will showcase Lingua Franca (Isabel Sandoval); Dogs Don’t Wear Pants (J.-P. Valkeapää); Top End Wedding (Wayne Blair); No Data Plan (Miko Revereza); The Cave (Tom Waller); Krabi, 2562 (Ben Rivers and Anocha Suwichakornpong); A Girl Missing, which is presented by Japan Foundation (Koji Fukada); and recent Locarno winner, Vitalina Varela (Pedro Costa).

A special program of Australian short films, Flickerfest, rounds up this section with two filmmakers visiting from Down Under.

This year, QCinema introduces a new section. New Horizons is a platform for debut films or second features from around the world. It explores a range of genres such as The Bare Necessity(Erwan De Luc); Buoyancy (Rodd Rathjen); Homeward (Nariman Aliev); The Red Phallus (Tashi Gyeltshen); Chola (Sanal Kumar Sasidharan; and System Crasher (Nora Fingscheidt).

Top End Wedding, Flickerfest Shortfilms, and Buoyancy are sponsored by the Australian Embassy.

Continuing its partnership with FDCP in promoting equality and representation, QCinema will screen six films representing the LGBTQ spectrum in the section, RainbowQC. These are Venice Queer Lion winner Jose (Li Cheng); Song Lang (Leon Le); Port Authority (Danielle Lessovitz); Where We Belong (Kongdej Jaturanrasamee); And Then We Danced (Levan Akin); and the Berlinale Teddy awardee, Brief Story from the Green Planet (Santiago Loza).

Part of the centennial celebration of Philippine cinema are two QCinema sections reflecting the rich heritage of classic and mainstream works by major directors, including the country’s national artists for film.

Centenial Classics will feature digitally restored films by ABS-CBN Film Restoration Project and FDCP. Part of the list are Biyaya ng Lupa (Manuel Silos); Malvarosa (Gregorio Fernandez); Insiang and Maynila sa Kuko ng Liwanag (Lino Brocka)Noli Me Tangere (Gerardo de Leon); and Tisoy (Ishmael Bernal).

A Special Life Achievement Award will be presented to Vicente del Rosario Jr., who established Viva Entertainment as one of the main, enduring pillars in the entertainment industry for more than fifty years.

QCinema is presenting the section, Viva Classics, in recognition of his outstanding contributions of “Boss Vic”, as he is fondly called, to the industry. Three of the previous decades’ well-loved hits will be shown here: Bituing Walang Ningning (Emmanuel H. Borlaza); Scorpio Nights 2 (Erik Matti); and Working Girls (Ishmael Bernal).



About QCinema

QCinema is the official film festival of Quezon City, touted as the “City of the Stars.” It was established in 2013 by the Quezon City Film Development Commission (QCFDC) helmed by Mayor Herbert Bautista and Vice Mayor Joy Belmonte.

Since its humble beginnings in 2013, QCinema has grown bigger, gaining traction in local and international film circuits for its roster of film entries. In 2017, it was recognized as one of the best film festivals in the country. For more information, visit qcinema.ph.

Costume & make-up: Designing the look of the new ‘Joker’

To create the new costumes in Warner Bros. Pictures’ new psychological thriller “Joker,” director Todd Phillips sought out costume designer Mark Bridges, who had designed for lead actor Joaquin Phoenix (Arthur Fleck aka Joker) in both the latter’s acclaimed films “The Master” and “Inherent Vice.”  

Bridges was flattered when Phillips reached out.  “Todd sent a lovely note that said that he had this project coming up and would I consider working on it.  Certainly to get a note like that from someone of Todd’s caliber… And of course working with an old friend like Joaquin is truly a joy for me.  We have a wonderful back and forth and I trust him.  We talk and he’s quite open to my suggestions as to how best represent on the outside this person he’s working on on the inside. So, all the pieces fell into place based on Todd’s personal request.”

Arthur Fleck’s Joker Suit

When it came down to the actual Joker costume for the film, Bridges happily reports that its design was, in part, written into the script as “a rust suit Arthur has had for many years.”  Still, he confesses, “You have a million thoughts running through your mind and there’s a little bit of external pressure to serve the fans as well as the piece.  But ultimately my work comes down to telling this particular story, where the outfit has to be something very organic to the character: pieces we’ve seen Arthur wear before, now reassembled to become what Joker wears.”

Working backwards, Bridges was able to determine when and how much of the building blocks to the final look would appear throughout the story.  “I started from the beginning and then took it on a journey—this piece in the comedy club, how it gets recombined with different items at different beats—to get to the final result.  When Joaquin and I had our final fitting for the full suit, it was all put together with the right shirt, the right waistcoat… It was dead-on `70s with a slightly longer line in the jacket, and he took on a strange, slinky confidence that he doesn’t have as Arthur, but which was just right for Joker.  To me, that was really satisfying.”

Phoenix agrees, “As Joker, he walks tall.  He’s confident.  Prior to that it’s like he was a shell of himself.”

The Joker Make-Up

Throughout the film, Arthur dons a clown face of varying degrees for various performances.  His ultimate Joker look was designed by Phillips and Phoenix as an exaggerated version of Arthur’s regular maquillage and executed to perfection by make-up department head Nicki Lederman and her team, utilizing the basic red and green of Arthur’s clown character.  Lederman herself created a unique shade for Arthur’s tears from various pigments she had on hand, dubbing it antique blue.

In Philippine cinemas Thursday, October 3, “Joker” is distributed in the Philippines by Warner Bros. Pictures, a WarnerMedia Company.  Use the hashtag #JokerMovie

About “Joker”

Forever alone in a crowd, Arthur Fleck seeks connection.  Yet, as he trods the sooted Gotham City streets and rides the graffitied mass transit rails of a hostile town teeming with division and dissatisfaction, Arthur wears two masks.  One, he paints on for his day job as a clown.  The other he can never remove; it’s the guise he projects in a futile attempt to feel he’s a part of the world around him, and not the misunderstood man whom life is repeatedly beating down.  Fatherless, Arthur has a fragile mother, arguably his best friend, who nicknamed him Happy, a moniker that’s fostered in Arthur a smile that hides the heartache beneath.  But, when bullied by teens on the streets, taunted by suits on the subway, or simply teased by his fellow clowns at work, this social outlier only becomes even more out of sync with everyone around him.

Directed, co-written and produced by Todd Phillips, “Joker” is the filmmaker’s original vision of the infamous DC villain, an origin story infused with, but distinctly outside, the character’s more traditional mythologies.  Phillips’ exploration of Arthur Fleck, who is indelibly portrayed by Joaquin Phoenix, is of a man struggling to find his way in Gotham’s fractured society.  Longing for any light to shine on him, he tries his hand as a stand-up comic, but finds the joke always seems to be on him.  Caught in a cyclical existence between apathy and cruelty and, ultimately, betrayal, Arthur makes one bad decision after another that brings about a chain reaction of escalating events in this gritty, allegorical character study.

Three-time Oscar nominee Phoenix stars in the titular role alongside Oscar winner Robert De Niro.  The film also stars Zazie Beetz, Frances Conroy, Brett Cullen, Glenn Fleshler, Bill Camp, Shea Whigham, Marc Maron, Douglas Hodge, Josh Pais and Leigh Gill.