Watch ‘Call Me By Your Name’ in this film concert with The Manila Symphony Orchestra

Set during an idyllic ‘80s Italian summer, the heartrending coming-of-age film Call Me By Your Name has left millions overwhelmed. Based on the novel by André Aciman, directed by Luca Guadagnino and written by James Ivory, it has received awards for Best Adapted Screenplay from the Academy, BAFTA, Writers Guild, and Critics’ Choice.

The story centers around two young men falling in love but explores so much more. It is a story about first love, lust, innocence, and loss. The film stars Timothée Chalamet as Elio, a precocious 17-year-old whose world is forever changed when he meets a slightly older doctoral student, Oliver (played by Armie Hammer). Twenty-two-year-old Chalamet received rave reviews and industry accolades for his outstanding performance, winning the Independent Spirit Award for Best Male Lead and the Gotham Independent Film Award for Breakthrough Actor.

This critically acclaimed film had an all-too-brief, limited commercial run in the Philippines. That is why CC:Concepts is excited to offer an opportunity for audiences to enjoy this cinematic masterpiece by presenting Call Me By Your Name In Concert with The Manila Symphony Orchestra on the 28th of October, 8PM at Samsung Hall, SM Aura. Early bird tickets have sold out in less than 24 hours. Regular tickets are now available on TicketWorld.

Film concerts feature full-length movies with their soundtracks performed live by a full-piece orchestra. There have been similar screenings of Gladiator at The Colosseum in Rome, Star Wars: A New Hope at The Royal Albert Hall in London, and The Godfather at the Tilles Center for the Performing Arts in New York, to name a few. Filipinos will have the chance to experience the movie for the first time, with the soundtrack performed live by The Manila Symphony Orchestra.

Call Me By Your Name: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack features the compositions of Ryuichi Sakamoto, John Adams, Erik Satie, Johann Sebastian Bach and Maurice Ravel. It also includes songs by The Psychedelic Furs, Franco Battiato, Giorgio Moroder, Loredana Bertè, Bandolero, Joe Esposito, F.R. David, and Sufjan Stevens whose original song “Mystery Love” was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Original Song.

Samsung Hall, the official venue of Call Me By Your Name In Concert, sets the stage for unparalleled entertainment. Nestled in the prime location of the Fort, Taguig City, the hall sits atop of the SM Aura Premier. The state-of-the-art venue covers over 1,000 square meters with retractable seats that can accommodate up to 1,000 guests. Samsung Hall completes the offerings of SM Aura Premier: the upscale mall that delivers the best in art, food, entertainment, and retail.

CC:Concepts presents Call Me By Your Name In Concert with The Manila Symphony Orchestra. Showing on the 28th of October, 8PM at Samsung Hall, SM Aura. Early bird tickets have sold out in less than 24 hours. Regular tickets are priced at Php 2,700, now available on TicketWorld. Prices are exclusive of ticket charges. For inquiries, email info@ccconcepts.ph

ABOUT CC:CONCEPTS

Established in 2016, after 25 events, the producers of the music event brand UNKNWN, are expanding. CC:Concepts is set to bring diverse live entertainment experiences to Manila. With a debut show of Call Me By Your Name In Concert with The Manila Symphony Orchestra, expect other event announcements soon.

MOVIE REVIEW: Call Me By Your Name (2017)

Combining elements of an independent film’s rawness and the influence of European cinema’s laid back tone, Luca Guadagnino’s Call Me By Your Name is a melancholic vision of a coming of age/coming out/first love/forbidden love narrative, all together, wrapped in an excellent storytelling, powered by perfectly tuned performances by Timothée Chalamet, Armie Hammer and Michael Stuhlberg.

Set in Northern Italy, 1983, the film follows the summer of young Elio (Chalamet) who meets one of his father’s graduate students, Oliver (Hanmer) in their summer house. The film travels through the middle of the tension and restraint of the two, which ultimately leads to a passionate and wild love affair that had them question their characters, their principles, and ultimately their lives.

Luca Guadagnino’s approach to this passionate love story is very heated yet subtle, as if the entire film awaits for a kettle of water to boil and scream. It thoroughly reflects the agony of an itch that has been yearning to be satisfied — from the tension of their apathetic yet suggestive touch, to them occupying the same bedroom divided by a bathroom. The entire film is a cliffhanger of what it feels before finally diving in to your sensuality. Both the sexual hunger and frustration, along with the confusing emotions that come along with it from a young teenager’s perspective, radiate to the audience impeccably, credits in huge part to Guadagnino’s purposely restrained direction and Chalamet’s commitment to his character’s honesty.

THE THEORY OF SPACE

Space played a vital role in the film, particularly on how the characters behave and how they react to the circumstances they are in. Notice that a vast majority of the film took place in Northern Italy, where the streets are narrow and the buildings are shooting to the sky, as if these characters are being enveloped onto a dimension where they are imprisoned by their own hometown. Notice how restricted they interact when they are in the portals of their home enclosed in walls and tight spaces; how a single touch on the ear and a single glance meant as if they are already consuming each other. Most of the scenes where they are able to breathe in and let out their emotions take place beside an open window — the moment where they decided to meet up at midnight; the first time the made love; and the moment they confessed why neither gave a sign. The open window served as an escapade from the imprisonment in their own homes. We can also recall that Elio first saw Oliver at his open window, which suggests the liberal possibilities of what the outside world has for him.

The scene where Elio finally confesses that he likes Oliver took place outdoors, yet they are separated by a statue in a roundabout fence — this suggests that this confession led to the fear of judgment, separation and distance. Both walked onto the entire circle finally meeting at the end where Oliver says “we can’t talk about it here” — suggesting the difficulty of avoiding taboo when restricted in their confinement. Take note that the story took place in 1983 — an era where people aren’t that liberal when it comes to homsexuality. The entire space of their town represent that closeminded society back in the day.

As soon as both had the opportunity to hit a vacation to Bergamo, the tone finally shifted from tight to free. The scene where both got off the train and ran on to the mountains, screaming with liberty, suggests their freedom to finally express what they feel — free from bars and enclosed spaces. This is also why Elio took Oliver to the top of the mountain for their first kiss, where there’s not a single sign of industrialization in the area. They are one with the nature, as raw as they are letting themselves be.

THE ‘PEACH’ SCENE

The scene where Elio masturbated through the hole of a pitted peach suggests how he tries to drive himself away from his homosexual tendencies. By general definition, peaches are usually associated with female sexuality. With the thought of Oliver leaving soon, Elio tries to go back to his old preference. However, it was apparent how quick his orgasm was and how fast he came, without really showing that he was able to enjoy or be passionate with it. It was one of those sexual encounters where you just get it over with. He falls asleep and doesn’t even take time to feel and savor the experience. That confirms that he is no longer interested in women; he is interested with Oliver.

The next scene where Oliver enters the room and tries to give Elio a head, clearly baffled by peach juice in his penis, he then questions “what did you do?” A question that resonates not just literally fucking a peach, but an interrogation of “has he gone straight again?” This question embarassed Elio; he breaks down, and says “I don’t want you to leave”. No matter how much he tries to distract himself by going back to his taste for women, he cannot cover the fact that it Oliver that he wants.

THE LAYERS OF GENERATION

Both Elio and Oliver are Gen X. Gen X are born at a time where everyone is slowly shifting societal values, but not quite all the way. This is the reason why they may have tested the waters on their feet, but they haven’t completely dove onto a relationship that they could have. This supports the decision as to why Oliver then marries a woman. Homosexuality in Gen X is considered a phase.

Elio’s father gave a beautiful monlogue by the end of the film, telling his son how beautiful and rare the affair he had with Oliver, because he himself wasn’t able to experience that. In a nutshell, he confesses that he is indeed homosexual, but wasn’t able to experience it himself unlike his son. Elio’s father is a member of the Baby Boomers generation, the one preceding Gen X. Baby Boomers are just basically traditional. Technically, Gen X with the societal values they eradicated. Homosexuality in the Baby Boomers generation is not just considered a phase; it is taboo that has to he resisted by all means.

Note that the film took place in 1983 where millennials (or the most open minded of them all) are just starting to be born. If the story took place in the present time with both protagonists as millennials, the ending could have been completely different. Both the characters’ decisions at the end of the film relied on the cultural and societal values that their generation beholds.

Another great film in reference to this theory is Maurice (1987) directed by James Ivory, who happens to be the screenwriter of Call Me By Your Name. That film tackled a completely different and much older era inhabited by the Silent Generation — a lot more conservative and a lot more traditional, wherein homosexuality isn’t just a simple taboo; it’s a crime.

THE TITLE’S OWNERSHIP

Overall, Call Me By Your Name will make you feel exactly what the title suggests. A sense of ownership to the characters, even by just saying their names, they belong to one another although they could never be together. A gesture as simple as bestowing your name to your lover is the only way you could own someone in an era that you could never do such. The film is well-tempered, exquisitely shot, emotionally written (but with brilliant subtlety), and honestly acted. It’s just too real. One of the best films of 2017.

 


5 out of 5 stars




‘Call Me By Your Name’s’ Timothée Chalamet, youngest Oscar Best Actor nominee in 74 years

At 22, Timothée Chalamet becomes the youngest Oscar Best Actor nominee in 74 years, and he gets this distinction for his performance in Sony Pictures Classic’s heartwrenching love story, Call Me By Your Name.

Directed by Luca Guadagnino, the film is the heady awakening of a 17-year old young man’s first passion. When Elio (Chalamet) falls for Oliver (Armie Hammer), the charismatic 24 year-old graduate student staying at his parents’ villa in northern Italy, it sets in motion an experience that will linger with both of them forever.

A large percentage of the story focuses on the myriad steps forward and backward between Elio and Oliver before their relationship finally becomes physical. Stressing anticipation through an unhurried buildup is common in Guadagnino’s films. Says Chalamet: “It’s the universally relatable game of cat and mouse and push and pull that occurs between people that are attracted to one another but have suspicions and insecurities about whether the other holds the same level of attraction. They also have trepidations because they aren’t in a time period or a location that is accepting or encouraging of them having an intimate relationship.”

While his films are praised for their eroticism, Guadagnino doesn’t depict sexuality gratuitously. Says Chalamet: “When you first see Elio and Oliver kiss, and the first time they really make love, the shots play out for awhile. You see the awkwardness and the physical tension in a way where, if there were a million cuts, would be lost.”

Rated R-16 With No Cuts by the MTRCB, Call Me By Your Name, is a sensual and transcendent tale of first love, based on the acclaimed novel by André Aciman.

It’s the summer of 1983 in the north of Italy, and Elio Perlman (Timothee Chalamet), a precocious 17- year-old young man, spends his days in his family’s 17th century villa transcribing and playing classical music, reading, and flirting with his friend Marzia (Esther Garrel).

Elio enjoys a close relationship with his father (Michael Stuhlbarg), an eminent professor specializing in Greco-Roman culture, and his mother Annella (Amira Casar), a translator, who favor him with the fruits of high culture in a setting that overflows with natural delights. While Elio’s sophistication and intellectual gifts suggest he is already a fully-fledged adult, there is much that yet remains innocent and unformed about him, particularly about matters of the heart.

One day, Oliver (Armie Hammer), a 24 year-old American college graduate student working on his doctorate, arrives as the annual summer intern tasked with helping Elio’s father. Amid the sun-drenched splendor of the setting, Elio and Oliver discover the heady beauty of awakening desire over the course of a summer that will alter their lives forever.

Now showing exclusively at Ayala Malls Cinemas, Call Me By Your Name is distributed by Columbia Pictures, local office of Sony Pictures Releasing International.

Here’s the list of cinemas showing ‘Call Me By Your Name’ uncut version starting January 31

Much anticipated gay romantic film Call Me By Your Name opens in the Philippines on January 31, 2018 exclusively in the following Ayala Malls Cinemas:

  • Alabang Town Center
  • Ayala Cebu
  • Bonifacio High Street
  • Greenbelt 3
  • Harbor Point
  • The 30th
  • Trinoma

Rated R-16 with no cuts by the MTRCB, it was well received during its paid sneak previews last January 22 and 23 at select cinemas. It held its Philippine premiere during its Cinema One Originals Festival run last November 2017.

Sony Pictures Classics’ heartbreaking love story received four major Academy Award nominations Tuesday night. It is now vying for Best Picture, Best Actor in a Leading Role (Timothee Chalamet), Best Adapted Screenplay (James Ivory) and Best Original Song – “Mystery of Love” – Music & Lyrics by Sufjan Stevens.


 


Call Me By Your Name is a sensual and transcendent tale of first love, based on the acclaimed novel by André Aciman.

It’s the summer of 1983 in the north of Italy, and Elio Perlman (Chalamet), a precocious 17- year-old young man, spends his days in his family’s 17th century villa transcribing and playing classical music, reading, and flirting with his friend Marzia (Esther Garrel).

Elio enjoys a close relationship with his father (Michael Stuhlbarg), an eminent professor specializing in Greco-Roman culture, and his mother Annella (Amira Casar), a translator, who favor him with the fruits of high culture in a setting that overflows with natural delights. While Elio’s sophistication and intellectual gifts suggest he is already a fully-fledged adult, there is much that yet remains innocent and unformed about him, particularly about matters of the heart.

One day, Oliver (Hammer), a 24 year-old American college graduate student working on his doctorate, arrives as the annual summer intern tasked with helping Elio’s father. Amid the sun-drenched splendor of the setting, Elio and Oliver discover the heady beauty of awakening desire over the course of a summer that will alter their lives forever.

Opening exclusively at Ayala Malls Cinemas starting January 31, Call Me By Your Name is distributed by Columbia Pictures, local office of Sony Pictures Releasing International.

Uncensored ‘Call Me By Your Name’ to hold paid previews Jan 22 & 23

Sony Pictures Classics’ Call Me By Your Name, hailed as the Best Picture of 2017 by the L.A. Film Critics, and likely to garner major Oscar nominations next week, will hold special sneak previews exclusively at Ayala Malls Cinemas on Monday and Tuesday, Jan. 22 & 23.

Rated R-16 With No Cuts by the MTRCB, the coming-of-age drama stars Armie Hammer and Timothee Chalamet (New York Film Critics Best Actor winner for his role) as two men who share a special kind of friendship.

The participating Ayala Malls are Glorietta 4, Greenbelt 3, Alabang Town Center, Trinoma, Harbor Point, Ayala Malls Legaspi, Ayala Center Cebu, Abreeza and Centrio. Fans may visit http://www.sureseats.com for screening schedules and advance ticket sales.

Call Me By Your Name, the new film by Luca Guadagnino, is a sensual and transcendent tale of first love, based on the acclaimed novel by André Aciman.

It’s the summer of 1983 in the north of Italy, and Elio Perlman (Chalamet), a precocious 17- year-old young man, spends his days in his family’s 17th century villa transcribing and playing classical music, reading, and flirting with his friend Marzia (Esther Garrel).

Elio enjoys a close relationship with his father (Michael Stuhlbarg), an eminent professor specializing in Greco-Roman culture, and his mother Annella (Amira Casar), a translator, who favor him with the fruits of high culture in a setting that overflows with natural delights. While Elio’s sophistication and intellectual gifts suggest he is already a fully-fledged adult, there is much that yet remains innocent and unformed about him, particularly about matters of the heart.

One day, Oliver (Hammer), a 24 year-old American college graduate student working on his doctorate, arrives as the annual summer intern tasked with helping Elio’s father. Amid the sun-drenched splendor of the setting, Elio and Oliver discover the heady beauty of awakening desire over the course of a summer that will alter their lives forever.

Call Me By Your Name is distributed by Columbia Pictures, local office of Sony Pictures Releasing International.

‘The Post,’ ‘Darkest Hour,’ ‘Call Me By Your Name’ ready for Globes glory Jan 8

Three critically acclaimed films that will soon be shown in the Philippines are expected to reap honors in the 7th Golden Globe Awards on Monday morning, January 8.

They are Steven Spielberg’s The Post, Luca Guadagnino’s Call Me By Your Name and Joe Wright’s Darkest Hour – all distributed locally by Columbia Pictures.

Starring Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep, The Post tells of a cover-up spanning the terms of four U.S. Presidents that pushed America’s first female newspaper publisher and a hard-driving editor to join an unprecedented battle between journalist and government.

The timely thriller is nominated for six awards, namely Best Picture Drama, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Screenplay and Best Original Score.

The Post marks the first time Meryl Streep, Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg have collaborated on a project.

Meanwhile, Call Me By Your Name, the gay romantic drama set in Northern Italy in 1983, is the story of seventeen year-old Elio (Timothee Chalamet) who begins a relationship with visiting Oliver (Armie Hammer), his father’s research assistant, with whom he bonds over his emerging sexuality, their Jewish heritage, and the beguiling Italian landscape.

Hailed for its “ravishing filmmaking and piercing wisdom,” Call Me By Your Name is vying for Best Picture Drama, Best Actor (Chalamet) and Best Supporting Actor (Hammer).

Finally, Darkest Hour gets a Best Actor nomination for its lead Gary Oldman as real-life British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, who must decide whether to negotiate with Adolf Hitler, or fight on against incredible odds.

Call Me By Your Name opens in Philippine cinemas on January 31, 2018, followed by Darkest Hour on February 14 and The Post on February 21.

‘Call Me By Your Name’ wins Best Feature at Gotham Awards 2017

Luca Guadagnino’s film adaptation of Andre Aciman’s novel ‘Call Me By Your Name’ wins Best Feature at the 2017 IFP Gotham Awards, which honors the year’s best in independent film.

Here’s the complete list of Gotham Award 2017 winners (in bold) together with the nominees.

Best Feature

Call Me by Your Name
Luca Guadagnino, director; Peter Spears, Luca Guadagnino, Emilie Georges, Rodrigo Teixeira, Marco Morabito, James Ivory, Howard Rosenman, producers (Sony Pictures Classics)

The Florida Project
Sean Baker, director; Sean Baker, Chris Bergoch, Kevin Chinoy, Andrew Duncan, Alex Saks, Francesca Silvestri, Shih-Ching Tsou, producers (A24)

Get Out
Jordan Peele, director; Sean McKittrick, Jason Blum, Edward H. Hamm, Jr., Jordan Peele, producers (Universal Pictures)

Good Time
Josh and Benny Safdie, directors; Paris Kasidokostas-Latsis, Terry Dougas, Sebastian Bear-McClard, Oscar Boyson, producers (A24)

I, Tonya
Craig Gillespie, director; Bryan Unkeless, Steven Rogers, Margot Robbie, Tom Ackerley, producers (NEON)

Best Documentary

WINNER: Strong Island
Yance Ford, director; Yance Ford, Joslyn Barnes, producers (Netflix)

Ex Libris – The New York Public Library 
Frederick Wiseman, director and producer (Zipporah Films)

Rat Film
Theo Anthony, director; Riel Roch-Decter, Sebastian Pardo, producers (MEMORY and Cinema Guild)

Whose Streets?
Sabaah Folayan, Damon Davis, directors; Sabaah Folayan, Damon Davis, Jennifer MacArthur, Flannery Miller, producers (Magnolia Pictures)

The Work
Jairus McLeary, director; Alice Henty, Eon McLeary, Jairus McLeary, Miles McLeary, producers (The Orchard and First Look Media)

Bingham Ray Breakthrough Director Award

WINNER: Jordan Peele for Get Out (Universal Pictures)

Maggie Betts for Novitiate (Sony Pictures Classics)

Greta Gerwig for Lady Bird (A24)

Kogonada for Columbus (Superlative Films/Depth of Field)

Joshua Z Weinstein for Menashe (A24)

Best Screenplay

WINNER: Get Out, Jordan Peele (Universal Pictures)

The Big Sick, Emily V. Gordon and Kumail Nanjiani (Amazon Studios)

Brad’s Status, Mike White (Amazon Studios)

Call Me by Your Name, James Ivory (Sony Pictures Classics)

Columbus, Kogonada (Superlative Films/Depth of Field)

Lady Bird, Greta Gerwig (A24)

Best Actor

WINNER: James Franco in The Disaster Artist (A24)

Willem Dafoe in The Florida Project (A24)

Daniel Kaluuya in Get Out (Universal Pictures)

Robert Pattinson in Good Time (A24)

Adam Sandler in The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected) (Netflix)

Harry Dean Stanton in Lucky (Magnolia Pictures)

Best Actress

WINNER: Saoirse Ronan in Lady Bird (A24)

Melanie Lynskey in I Don’t Feel at Home in This World Anymore (Netflix)

Haley Lu Richardson in Columbus (Superlative Films/Depth of Field)

Margot Robbie in I, Tonya (NEON)

Lois Smith in Marjorie Prime (FilmRise)

Breakthrough Actor

WINNER: Timothée Chalamet in Call Me by Your Name (Sony Pictures Classics)

Mary J. Blige in Mudbound (Netflix)

Harris Dickinson in Beach Rats (NEON)

Kelvin Harrison, Jr. in It Comes at Night (A24)

Brooklynn Prince in The Florida Project (A24)

Breakthrough Series – Long Form

WINNER: Atlanta, Donald Glover, creator; Donald Glover, Dianne McGunigle, Paul Simms, executive producers (FX Networks)

Better Things, Pamela Adlon, Louis C.K., creators; Dave Becky, M. Blair Breard, Louis C.K., Pamela Adlon, executive producers (FX Networks)

Dear White People, Justin Simien, creator; Yvette Bowser, Justin Simien, Stephanie Allain, Julia Lebedev, executive producers (Netflix)

Fleabag, Phoebe Waller-Bridge, creator; Phoebe Waller-Bridge, Harry Williams, Jack Williams, executive producers (Amazon)

Search Party, Sarah-Violet Bliss, Charles Rogers, Michael Showalter, creators; Sarah-Violet Bliss, Charles Rogers, Michael Showalter, Tony Hernandez, Lilly Burns, executive producers (TBS)

Breakthrough Series – Short Form

WINNER: The Strange Eyes of Dr. Myes, Nancy Andrews, creator (YouTube)

555, Kate Berlant, Andrew DeYoung and John Early, creators (Vimeo)

Inconceivable, Joel Ashton McCarthy, creator (YouTube)

Junior, Zoe Cassavetes, creator (Blackpills and VICE)

Let Me Die a Nun, Sarah Salovaara, creator (Vimeo)