MOVIE REVIEW: Deadpool 2 (2018)

Deadpool 2 revs up more on meta-references, violence and attitude. It simply won’t back down up until the post-credits.

Deadpool 2

If the first Deadpool movie made history by breaking down the fourth-wall in the superhero film genre, this sequel outdoes its predecessor by revving up on everything that fans expect of it: meta-references and gratuitous violence. So much of these, that this time, you can almost feel its portrayer, Ryan Reynolds eating popcorn beside you, giving you rib nudges all throughout. And with the amount of bloodshed and mockery thrown in this film, expect some lasting bruises on your way out.

By design, Deadpool should make fun of other films and its first victim is no other than Wolverine (it’s no secret when the trailer explicitly markets this film with a line, “from the studio that killed Wolverine”). Then, we are served with a stylish, James Bond-inspired opening sequence featuring Celine Dion’s original song, “Ashes.” This is played along Deadpool’s signature fake credits (“directed by one of the guys who killed the dog in John Wick”) to remind us that this sequel can be self-deprecating too. It is Marvel’s slowly-diminishing competitor, DC Comics who takes the biggest shade of all and past the comic-book genre, even B-films like Human Centipede can’t escape the travesty. Deadpool 2 simply won’t back down, up until the post-credit scene that everyone’s been raving about.

READ MORE: Final trailer for ‘Deadpool 2’ pokes fun at superhero movies

But the meta-ness of its humor is only one aspect it. It’s the raunchy side that induces you to laugh your guts out. It is indeed excessive—and reprising screenwriters Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick (and now joined by Reynolds himself) could be trying hard for all we care—but it doesn’t matter. Wade Wilson/Deadpool is not a protagonist who acts like a comedian desperately wanting his audience to laugh. He is a hilarious madman who draws comedy out of tragedy after being tortured in the first film. Hence, he can’t help himself. It all works.

The most important thing is Deadpool’s humor, no matter how vulgar and edgy it is, it does not rely on racism, sexism, homophobia and other real-life offensive themes. In fact, the film goes in the opposite direction and mocks those who tolerate them. Deadpool calls his motley crew as “forward-thinking and gender-neutral,” a character comments on the discrimination of plus-sized heroes in Hollywood, and so on.

Deadpool 2 X-Force
The X-Force (L to R): Domino (Zazie Beetz), Zeitgeist (Bill Skarsgard), Deadpool (Ryan Reynolds), Shatterstar (Lewis Tan) and Bedlam (Terry Crews).

Along with old-timers Colossus (Stefan Kapicic), Negasonic Teenage Warhead (Brianna Hildebrand), Weasel (TJ Miller), Dopinder (Karan Soni) and Blind Al (Leslie Uggams), DP2 returns with more wonderfully diverse cast members. After conducting hilarious quick-cut interviews, Deadpool assembles his not-so-derivative team called the X-Force crew: Bedlam (Terry Crews), Zeitgeist (Bill Skarsgard), Shatterstar (Lewis Tan), Peter the human (Rob Delaney), and Domino (Zazie Beetz) who cinematically shines with her luck-manipulation skills.

We learn from the get-go that Deadpool and his long-time girlfriend Vanessa (Morena Baccarin) plan to have a baby of their own and with a troubled fireball-hurling kid Russell/FireFist (Julian Dennison) stepping on the picture, he test-runs his capacity to be a father. The X-Force must protect the kid from a time-hopping terminator-esque Cable. The latter being played by Josh Brolin fresh from his Thanos role so we can expect more jokes in this department. As a whole, DP2 actually works as an antidote from the harrowing end of the recently released Avengers: Infinity War.

Josh Brolin as cyberkinetic soldier Cable

Defying morals is part of Deadpool’s charm and as we can see here, Deadpool convinces Russell that killing will set him to the wrong path. Yet, he and his team does this by slicing and dicing a lot of bodies along the way. It’s ultra-violent as ever than before but it works hand-in-hand with the humor and blink-and-you’ll-miss-it cameos. These are all punchlines in this bloody raucous good-time.

Director David Leitch (who I also recently learned is a former stuntman) knows his angles well and employs neat camera tricks here. But what makes DP2 stand out even more is the use of its soundtrack. When is the last time that you heard songs like Dolly Parton’s ‘9 to 5’, Air Supply’s ‘All Out of Love’ or Annie’s ‘Tomorrow’ used in a fight scene? Only Deadpool has the craziness to do so.

On the other hand, Reynolds’ attitude and charisma permeates through his mask that he almost immortalizes himself with this character (much like Robert Downey Jr. does in his Iron Man). He has a crazy level of  hyper-awareness that he can point out obligatory tropes that even DP2 is also guilty of doing. He throws in comments like, “big CGI fight coming up!” “that’s just lazy writing,” or “if we finish this mission, we can skip the third act and eat chimichangas after.” It indicts pop culture and questions mainstream taste, showing gruesome stuff while asking its viewers, “Are you enjoying this? Of course, you are!” Nothing is sacred here, except the comedy itself.

Deadpool with Colossus (Stefan Kapicic)

On an entirely different note, I still have my reservations whether or not to officially include Deadpool in the X-Men franchise. How do you put a character in a universe that does not use fourth-wall breaking comments? Will he start calling Professor X as Patrick Stewart or James McAvoy? That being said, I think it is best for his character to stay out of it. But even if the executives decide to go in that direction, it can still be interesting how they do it. Marvel, please don’t screw this up in the future.

And now to answer the question of diminishing returns. Does DP2 wear me down after using more of the same technique? At this point, not yet. The strain occasionally shows but for the most part it pays off with big laughs with an emotional core strong enough to keep it together. Deadpool 2 can be as subversive as it can be but deep inside it’s just a comic book movie that wants to be loved. The bottomline is, if you enjoyed the first Deadpool film, you will most certainly enjoy this sequel too.


4.5 out of 5 stars


About Deadpool 2

After surviving a near fatal bovine attack, a disfigured cafeteria chef (Wade Wilson) struggles to fulfill his dream of becoming Mayberry’s hottest bartender while also learning to cope with his lost sense of taste. Searching to regain his spice for life, as well as a flux capacitor, Wade must battle ninjas, the Yakuza, and a pack of sexually aggressive canines, as he journeys around the world to discover the importance of family, friendship, and flavor – finding a new taste for adventure and earning the coveted coffee mug title of World’s Best Lover.

Distributed by 20th Century Fox, Deadpool 2 is now showing worldwide on May 18, 2018 starring Ryan Reynolds, Josh Brolin, Morena Baccarin, Julian Dennison, Zazie Beetz, Karan Soni, Brianna Hildebrand, T.J. Miller, Leslie Uggams, Stefan Kapicic and Eddie Marsan.

Directed by David Leitch from a screenplay written by Rhett Reese, Paul Wernick and Ryan Reynolds (R-16). Runtime: 119 minutes.

 

Ryan Reynolds back with ‘Deadpool’ writers for sci-fi thriller ‘Life’

Deadpool himself Ryan Reynolds stars in Columbia Pictures’ new terrifying sci-fi thriller Life as astronaut Rory Adams, an engineer and specialist in space walking. “This script had such a degree of reality and a feeling of constant tension,” says Reynolds, who stars alongside Jake Gyllenhaal and Rebecca Ferguson.

The film reunites Reynolds with his Deadpool writers Rhett Reese & Paul Wernick and his Safe House director Daniel Espinosa. “It begins with an air of discovery that turns to a tension that permeates the whole film as we learn more and more about this thing that we’ve put on board the ISS,” he says.

Life is about a team of scientists aboard the International Space Station whose mission of discovery turns to one of primal fear when they find a rapidly evolving life form that caused extinction on Mars, and now threatens the crew and all life on Earth.

“Rhett and Paul wrote a very scary, well-paced thriller, but it’s really fed by their investment in the characters,” says producer Julie Lynn. “These six astronauts are smart, industrious, tenacious, hardworking – and when things get hairy we care about what’s going to happen to them.”

Offers Reynolds, “Some of us are a little more excited than others. Some are incredibly aggressive, others more conservative. And these ideas are mixed together – but like a lot of human actions, we push things a little farther than we should.”

Reynolds’ character, Adams, is the spacewalk specialist, and he’ll tell you just how cool that is. (It’s f-in cool.) Just charming enough to keep from being called cocky, and way more handsome than he needs to be, Adams is the rock star of the mission.

“A mission specialist is a fancy way of saying he’s a mechanic who understands how the ship works, how to fix anything that breaks,” says Reynolds. “He’s also the guy that specializes in the spacewalk and he operates the Canadarm, a system that they use to capture the Mars capsule that is hurdling through space.”

Shooting for the space station scenes, the filmmakers created a zero G effect for the actors with harnesses and other effects. Reynolds says that while on Earth, it takes a good deal of force to stop momentum or push off of an object, it takes only a slight touch in space. “If you’re truly weightless, just applying the slightest amount of pressure in one direction will send your entire body in another direction,” he says. “The trick is not to land. Even if you’re grabbing onto something as you stop, just touching it will actually make you stop. I spoke to some astronauts going into this and they were saying that you can actually get stuck in the middle of a room, and you would perish there unless somebody comes and pushes you to a grab handle.”

On the whole, Reynolds found zero gravity an exciting challenge. “We had to do a lot of training,” he recalls. “We had an obstacle course set up in the weeks leading up to shooting where we played around on the wires and learned what the wires are capable of doing and how much we could move around. There’s no sequence in the movie where we’re not weightless. We were always on wires, always floating and slightly moving all the time. It can feel bizarre, because you get invested emotionally in the scene, and then suddenly you forget to move, you forget to float. It was a challenge, but it’s fun playing an astronaut.”

Still showing in select cinemas across the Philippines, Life is distributed by Columbia Pictures, local office of Sony Pictures Releasing International.

R-rated superhero film ‘Deadpool’ tops PH box-office weekend at P145-M

The hyper-hero “Deadpool,” the latest Marvel superhero everyone’s talking about and can’t get enough of has landed number one at the Phils.’ box-office with an impressive haul of P 145 million on its first five days of release (opened Feb. 10).

Dominating a crowded week and despite its R-rating, “Deadpool” has seen new and repeat viewing cineastes such that its box-office dominance carried on over the red-hot Valentine’s weekend. Its opening weekend grossed a total of P 145M, surpassing that of “Fifty Shades of Grey’s” opening weekend at P94M. “Deadpool” now holds the Biggest Opening Weekend for an R-rated film all-time industry-wide. So far, with its remarkable opening weekend, “Deadpool” now stands as the Biggest Opening Weekend for the year industry-wide, beating “Everything About Her” and is now the 2nd Biggest Fox Opening Weekend all-time, outranking “Taken’s” P106.8M and next to “X-Men: Days of Future Past’s” PhP175M.

With the nation’s penchant for a good laugh and craving for a new adventure, “Deadpool” breakthroughs as a relatable superhero who does indeed breaks the fourth wall, talking to the audience that never fails to elicit rip-roaring laughter among viewers in cinemas across the nation. “Deadpool” to-date continues to pull viewers in and from its opening weekend report, following are the top cinemas where “Deadpool” grossed the highest:

SM MALL OF ASIA (6.7M); SM MEGAMALL (6.2M); SM NORTH EDSA/THE BLOCK (5.8M); TRINOMA (4.3M); SM CEBU (3.7M); GLORIETTA4 (3.5M); GREENBELT3 (3.4M); GATEWAY CINEPLEX/ALIMALL (3.1M); SM AURA (3M); EASTWOOD (2.7M); BONIFACIO HIGHSTREET (2.46M); ALABANG TOWN CENTER (2.45M); AYALA CEBU(2.26M); THEATREMALL (2.23M); SM CLARK (2.14M); POWERPLANT (2.11M); SM SOUTHMALL (2M); SM ILOILO (1.98M); SHANG CINEPLEX (1.96M) AND NEWPORT (1.92M).

“Deadpool” which also opened in the US at top spot, starring Ryan Reynolds and directed by first timed director Tim Miller is based upon Marvel Comics’ most unconventional anti-hero tells the origin story of former Special Forces operative turned mercenary Wade Wilson, who after being subjected to a rogue experiment that leaves him with accelerated healing powers adopts the alter ego Deadpool. Armed with his new abilities and a dark, twisted sense of humor, Deadpool hunts down the man who nearly destroyed his life. Also starring in “Deadpool” are Morena Baccarin, TJ Miller, Ed Skrein, Gina Carano and Brianna Hildebrand.

“Deadpool” is currently in cinemas nationwide in 2D, IMAX and 4DX screens from 20th Century Fox distributed by Warner Bros.

Ryan Reynolds plays antihero ‘Deadpool’

Based upon Marvel Comics’ most unconventional anti-hero, “Deadpool” tells the origin story of former Special Forces operative turned mercenary Wade Wilson, who after being subjected to a rogue experiment leaves him with accelerated healing powers and adopts the alter ego Deadpool. Armed with his new abilities and a dark, twisted sense of humor, Deadpool hunts down the man who nearly destroyed his life.

Along with Deadpool fighting in the buff, the film’s torrid scenes between Wade and Vanessa, and Deadpool’s non-stop and off-color verbal stylings, all contribute to the film’s R-rating. “I think the R-rating allows us to have a level of reality that wouldn’t be possible with a PG-13,” says Miller. “I also think it’s an important step in the expansion of the genre. There’s a type of film that can only be made with this rating, and that really expands the boundaries of the stories comic book movies can tell.”

“Deadpool” star and producer Ryan Reynolds has no bigger fan than Marvel Comics legend Stan Lee, who has a fun cameo in the film and also serves as an executive producer. “There’s never been a character like Deadpool, and Ryan Reynolds plays him as though he was born to play the role,” says Lee. “Just like Robert Downey, Jr. was born to be Iron Man, you just can’t picture anybody else besides Ryan as Deadpool.”

DEADPOOL Angel Dust (Gina Carano) roughs up barkeep Weasel (T.J. Miller), in DEADPOOL. Photo Credit: Joe Lederer TM & © 2015 Marvel & Subs.  TM and © 2015 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation.  All rights reserved.  Not for sale or duplication.
DEADPOOL
Angel Dust (Gina Carano) roughs up barkeep Weasel (T.J. Miller), in DEADPOOL.
Photo Credit: Joe Lederer
TM & © 2015 Marvel & Subs.  TM and © 2015 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation.  All rights reserved.  Not for sale or duplication.

Reynolds embraced the character’s myriad (and often twisted) facets. “In the comic book world, Deadpool is a man of our time with the ability to spout just the right thing, in terms of a pop culture reference, at the worst possible moment,” he quips. “That’s what makes him interesting to me and also makes him sort of limitless.”

The character’s accessibility is defined partly by his twisted sense of humor. “It really draws you in,” Reynolds notes. “Deadpool has this bright, optimistic outlook on life, even though his life is pretty shitty. I mean, he’s become horribly disfigured from the experiments that gave him his powers. And, he can’t find love and he’s more than a little insane.”

Reynolds’ director is also infused with Deadpoolian traits. “Tim has a bit of Wade Wilson’s acerbic attitude in him,” says Reynolds. “He sort of speaks, moves and talks like him, too. I think that helped Tim access the character. He really understands how to balance the over-the-top action and humor with pathos, because in some ways, Wade Wilson is a tragic character.”

51703768 Actor Ryan Reynolds suits up to film and action scene on a viaduct for "Deadpool" on April 7, 2015 in Vancouver, Canada. The new Marvel movie tells the story of a former Special Forces operative turned mercenary who is subjected to a rogue experiment that leaves him with accelerated healing powers. FameFlynet, Inc - Beverly Hills, CA, USA - +1 (818) 307-4813
51703768 Actor Ryan Reynolds suits up to film and action scene on a viaduct for “Deadpool” on April 7, 2015 in Vancouver, Canada. The new Marvel movie tells the story of a former Special Forces operative turned mercenary who is subjected to a rogue experiment that leaves him with accelerated healing powers. FameFlynet, Inc – Beverly Hills, CA, USA – +1 (818) 307-4813

Bringing the exploits of an unconventional superhero to life sometimes created an equally unexpected vibe on set. Notes Stan Lee: “When you see Tim Miller and Ryan Reynolds working together, they are both so in sync; they see the movie the same way. It’s though they’re playing a game and each one of them is doing his job so magnificently. When I did my scene in “Deadpool,” I didn’t even know I was working. When it was over, I said, ‘When do we start?’ and Tim said, ‘You’re finished.’ That’s how effortless he makes it seem.”

The filmmakers remain convinced the time is right for this unique movie event. “When comic book movies first appeared, they had to be ‘tentpole’ movies, which had to appeal to the broadest possible audience,” Miller says. “Deadpool was always meant to be an edgy film, and the time is right for it. The genre of superhero and comic book films is wider and it feels like it’s time to do a film like this, that sort of pushes the boundaries a little further.”

Rated R-16 by the local censors board, “Deadpool” will open in IMAX and 2D cinemas on February 10 from 20th Century Fox to be distributed by Warner Bros.

Shoot and slice as ‘Deadpool’ invades PH cinemas with R-16 rating

Manila, Philippines – “Deadpool” has been rated by the MTRCB (local censors board) with an R-16 rating due to the movie’s strong violence and language throughout including sexual content and graphic nudity.

“Deadpool” director Tim Miller couldn’t agree more as with all other R-ratings from across the globe. Along with Deadpool fighting in the buff, the film’s torrid scenes between Wade and Vanessa, and Deadpool’s non-stop and off-color verbal stylings, all contribute to the film’s R-rating. “I think the R-rating allows us to have a level of reality that wouldn’t be possible with a PG-13,” says Miller. “I also think it’s an important step in the expansion of the genre. There’s a type of film that can only be made with this rating, and that really expands the boundaries of the stories comic book movies can tell.”

Ryan Reynolds Films "Deadpool"

As fandom gets ready for “Deadpool” this February 2016 opening, the filmmakers remain convinced the time is right for this unique movie event. “When comic book movies first appeared, they had to be ‘tentpole’ movies, which had to appeal to the broadest possible audience,” Miller says. “Deadpool was always meant to be an edgy film, and the time is right for it. The genre of superhero and comic book films is wider and it feels like it’s time to do a film like this, that sort of pushes the boundaries a little further.”

“Deadpool” started life as Wade Wilson, an elite Special Forces operative turned mercenary. An expert marksman, swordsman and martial artist, and proficient in several languages, Wilson was diagnosed with terminal cancer, threatening to cut his days of being a hired gun short. Approached by a secret experimental program, Wilson was presented with a choice: take part in their twisted experiments for a chance to cure his cancer, or bear the pain of imminent death. But the shadowy facility didn’t exactly cure Wade’s cancer… What they did was activate dormant mutant genes that imbued Wade with with regenerative healing powers. In fact, the procedure advanced Wade’s cancer, leaving him permanently disfigured but incapable of death, the perfect cocktail for an unhealthy mind. Dubbed “The Merc with a Mouth”, Deadpool is a pop culture-literate antihero unique amongst comic book characters in that he can break the fourth wall and flip superhero conventions on their head.

The character’s accessibility is defined partly by his twisted sense of humor. “It really draws you in,” Reynolds notes. “Deadpool has this bright, optimistic outlook on life, even though his life is pretty shitty. I mean, he’s become horribly disfigured from the experiments that gave him his powers. And, he can’t find love and he’s more than a little insane.”

Bringing the exploits of an unconventional superhero to life sometimes created an equally unexpected vibe on set. Notes Stan Lee: “When you see Tim Miller and Ryan Reynolds working together, they are both so in sync; they see the movie the same way. It’s though they’re playing a game and each one of them is doing his job so magnificently. When I did my scene in DEADPOOL, I didn’t even know I was working. When it was over, I said, ‘When do we start?’ and Tim said, ‘You’re finished.’ That’s how effortless he makes it seem.”

That kind of playfulness, intermixed with a badass physicality, marks the film’s acrobatic action sequences. “Deadpool’s always been more lithe and agile than other characters in the Marvel universe,” says Liefeld. “Without even thinking about it, he can drop into a moving car and then take out a small army of tough guys, all the while cracking wise.”

“Deadpool” invades cinemas nationwide on February 10 (2D and IMAX screens) from 20th Century Fox to be distributed by Warner Bros.

‘Deadpool’ to paint the town red on Feb 10, also in IMAX

Expect plenty of wry humour in “Deadpool,” directed by Tim Miller and at Reynolds’ own experiences in the comic book world. Based upon Marvel Comics’ most unconventional anti-hero, “Deadpool” tells the origin story of former Special Forces operative turned mercenary Wade Wilson, who after being subjected to a rogue experiment that leaves him with accelerated healing powers adopts the alter ego Deadpool. Armed with his new abilities and a dark, twisted sense of humor, Deadpool hunts down the man who nearly destroyed his life.

“Deadpool” star and producer Ryan Reynolds has no bigger fan than Marvel Comics legend Stan Lee, who has a fun cameo in the film and also serves as an executive producer. “There’s never been a character like Deadpool, and Ryan Reynolds plays him as though he was born to play the role,” says Lee. “Just like Robert Downey, Jr. was born to be Iron Man, you just can’t picture anybody else besides Ryan as Deadpool.”

Reynolds embraced the character’s myriad (and often twisted) facets. “In the comic book world, Deadpool is a man of our time with the ability to spout just the right thing, in terms of a pop culture reference, at the worst possible moment,” he quips. “That’s what makes him interesting to me and also makes him sort of limitless.”

 TM and © 2015 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation.  All Rights Reserved.  Not for sale or duplication.

TM and © 2015 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation.  All Rights Reserved.  Not for sale or duplication.

Reynolds had long championed a film version of the iconic comics character. His deep involvement in the film’s development continued throughout production, in brainstorming sessions with director Tim Miller and screenwriters Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick (“Zombieland”).

Tim Miller, who makes his feature film directorial debut on Deadpool, notes, “I think Ryan’s personality and DNA are really infused in the character. It was a close match to begin with, which is why Ryan was so attracted to Deadpool in the first place.”

“Ryan has a tremendous sense of humor, is very quick, and the character has really seeped into him,” says Reese. “He became in a way our ‘Deadpool Police.’ Whenever we got off tone or were writing in a way that didn’t feel quite right, Ryan would say, ‘I don’t think that sounds like Deadpool.’ We knew he was the best arbiter, because Ryan knows and loves the comics and has assimilated Deadpool’s voice and sense of humor.”
“We’re staying as true to the character as possible,” adds Reynolds. “We really ran with the idea of Deadpool being aware he’s a comic book anti-hero. It gave us the freedom to tell this story in a totally unorthodox way. We occupy a space that no other comic book movie has – or can.”

DEADPOOL TM and © 2015 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation.  All Rights Reserved.  Not for sale or duplication.
DEADPOOL TM and © 2015 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation.  All Rights Reserved.  Not for sale or duplication.

Deadpool is a unique figure in the Marvel Universe. Fabian Nicieza and Rob Liefeld created Deadpool as possessing an often non-superheroic attitude. A sardonic foil to the holier-than-thou heroes and villains that populate Marvel’s other comics, Deadpool constantly cracks edgy jokes and breaks the fourth wall.

Liefeld joins Stan Lee in his admiration of the filmmakers’ work in translating the character to the big screen. “DEADPOOL explodes with action,” says Liefeld. “Ryan, Tim Miller, Paul and Rhett mined all the good stuff in the comics from about a ten-year period and came up with a movie that sews it all together. This will be the Deadpool that will become canon moving forward!”

It’s a date on Valentine’s week with “Deadpool” starting February 10 in cinemas (and IMAX screens) nationwide as released by 20th Century Fox to be distributed by Warner Bros.

‘Deadpool’ receives overwhelming raves from early screenings

20th Century Fox’s recent reveal of Deadpool’s redband trailer was eventually followed by a special advanced screening in New York and Los Angeles, though the studio showed an unfinished version of the movie, the fans’ reactions as had been reported in Screenrant is overwhelmingly positive.

The ones who got to screen it first are vouching that the studio, Tim Miller and Ryan Reynolds did right about it this time, even saying that this is the best comic movie ever in the Marvel universe! Tweets had gone viral describing the movie (rough cut) as being “phenomenal, great job, my favorite Marvel movies of all time, outstanding and the best movie ever seen.”

Directed by Tim Miller, “Deadpool,” adapted from the Marvel Comics character created in 1991 by Fabian Nicieza and Rob Liefeld, tells the origin story of Wade Wilson (played by Ryan Reynolds), whose terminal cancer is ‘cured’ by the same Weapon X program that created Wolverine, leaving him permanently disfigured, but impervious to pain and able to regenerate from his wounds.

Dubbed “The Merc with a Mouth”, Deadpool is a pop culture-literate antihero unique amongst comic book characters in that he can break the fourth wall and flip superhero conventions on their head.

On the movie’s action, Lucas Siegel from Comicbook.com shares, “The violence is definitely crazy, definitely over-the-top, and definitely gory. But it’s also well-choreographed, and some of these action sequences are so quick and stunning, you can’t blink for minutes at a time, for fear of missing the next unbelievable stunt. It’s a blast to watch, and impressive – it ramps up nicely, as well, from a familiar opening sequence to the explosive finale.”

Siegel further injects, “This is a fun movie, and it just feels oh so Deadpool. Rarely have I seen a comic book movie not just capture a character so well, but add to it, as well. Deadpool is simply what fans have been dying for, and it’s clear in every moment that it was made by hardcore fans, too.

“Deadpool” arrives February 10, 2016 in cinemas nationwide as released by 20th Century Fox to be distributed by Warner Bros.

Oscar nominee, first-time director Tim Miller helms ‘Deadpool’

Make no mistake about it, the term first-time director may project an impression of being inexperienced, yet despite the fact that Tim Miller’s first feature film is “Deadpool,” his unique approach in filmmaking makes him acutely ready to helm this year’s hotly anticipated superhero movie starring Ryan Reynolds in the titular role.

Tim Miller is already an Academy Award nominee for his previous work in the movie “Gopher Broke” nominated for the Best Animated Short Film. Miller is also the co-founder of Blur Studio, which specializes in visual effects and animation for the motion picture and videogame industries.

ryan-reynolds-deadpool-movie-image

Moreover, his experience and work in the fantastic title sequences and breakthrough CG action shots for films such as the highly-acclaimed “The Girl with The Dragon Tattoo” by David Fincher, “Thor: The Dark World” and Taylor’s Marvel adaptations make Miller bring his own kind of storytelling and action into the movie “Deadpool” adapted from the Marvel Comics created in 1991 by Fabian Nicieza and Rob Liefeld.

“Deadpool” which also stars Morena Baccarin, Gina Carano, TJ Miller and Ed Skrein tells the origin of Wade Wilson (Reynolds), whose terminal cancer is ‘cured’ by the same Weapon X program that created Wolverine, leaving him permanently disfigured, but impervious to pain and able to regenerate from his wounds. A pop culture-literate antihero different amongst comic book characters, “Deadpool” has been dubbed as ‘The Merc with a Mouth” who can break the fourth wall and flip superhero conventions in their head.

DEADPOOL

Miller recalls that a (20th Century) Fox executive who’d been working on the “X-Men: First Class” movie had seen his work on a piece he had done for a DC universe project, “He thought X-Men: First Class” could use some help with working out the detailed action choreography, so I was brought on to help with that. He was like, “You understand superheroes and how they fight each other. He came down and we met, and by the end of that meeting he said, “You know, I think you should really be directing your own film. You’re a first-timer so I can’t get you on anything big, but we have this other film… Deadpool. Are you interested?” I’d read the script already and I thought it was great, so I jumped at the chance. And then there were a whole series of hurdles to jump over, to make sure Ryan liked me, to make sure [the producer] Lauren Shuler Donner liked me, to make sure I wasn’t some kind of crazy weirdo,” shares Miller.

Tim Miller’s “Deadpool” movie features endless references to Reynolds’ own dalliances with the superhero universe, and most especially his lead role in “Green Lantern.” Suffice to say, Wade Wilson isn’t a fan. “Please don’t make the super-suit green,” he tells the facility scientists. “Or animated.” When Fox showed off a teaser for the film at Comic-Con, the studio poked fun at their own first go at the character. “From the studio that inexplicably sewed his mouth shut the first time, comes five-time Academy Award viewer Ryan Reynolds…”

A different kind, in fact, not-the-hero-you’re-expecting saves the day when “Deadpool” opens February 10, 2016 in Philippine cinemas from 20th Century Fox to be distributed by Warner Bros.

DEADPOOL