Ryan Reynolds back with ‘Deadpool’ writers for sci-fi thriller ‘Life’

Deadpool himself Ryan Reynolds stars in Columbia Pictures’ new terrifying sci-fi thriller Life as astronaut Rory Adams, an engineer and specialist in space walking. “This script had such a degree of reality and a feeling of constant tension,” says Reynolds, who stars alongside Jake Gyllenhaal and Rebecca Ferguson.

The film reunites Reynolds with his Deadpool writers Rhett Reese & Paul Wernick and his Safe House director Daniel Espinosa. “It begins with an air of discovery that turns to a tension that permeates the whole film as we learn more and more about this thing that we’ve put on board the ISS,” he says.

Life is about a team of scientists aboard the International Space Station whose mission of discovery turns to one of primal fear when they find a rapidly evolving life form that caused extinction on Mars, and now threatens the crew and all life on Earth.

“Rhett and Paul wrote a very scary, well-paced thriller, but it’s really fed by their investment in the characters,” says producer Julie Lynn. “These six astronauts are smart, industrious, tenacious, hardworking – and when things get hairy we care about what’s going to happen to them.”

Offers Reynolds, “Some of us are a little more excited than others. Some are incredibly aggressive, others more conservative. And these ideas are mixed together – but like a lot of human actions, we push things a little farther than we should.”

Reynolds’ character, Adams, is the spacewalk specialist, and he’ll tell you just how cool that is. (It’s f-in cool.) Just charming enough to keep from being called cocky, and way more handsome than he needs to be, Adams is the rock star of the mission.

“A mission specialist is a fancy way of saying he’s a mechanic who understands how the ship works, how to fix anything that breaks,” says Reynolds. “He’s also the guy that specializes in the spacewalk and he operates the Canadarm, a system that they use to capture the Mars capsule that is hurdling through space.”

Shooting for the space station scenes, the filmmakers created a zero G effect for the actors with harnesses and other effects. Reynolds says that while on Earth, it takes a good deal of force to stop momentum or push off of an object, it takes only a slight touch in space. “If you’re truly weightless, just applying the slightest amount of pressure in one direction will send your entire body in another direction,” he says. “The trick is not to land. Even if you’re grabbing onto something as you stop, just touching it will actually make you stop. I spoke to some astronauts going into this and they were saying that you can actually get stuck in the middle of a room, and you would perish there unless somebody comes and pushes you to a grab handle.”

On the whole, Reynolds found zero gravity an exciting challenge. “We had to do a lot of training,” he recalls. “We had an obstacle course set up in the weeks leading up to shooting where we played around on the wires and learned what the wires are capable of doing and how much we could move around. There’s no sequence in the movie where we’re not weightless. We were always on wires, always floating and slightly moving all the time. It can feel bizarre, because you get invested emotionally in the scene, and then suddenly you forget to move, you forget to float. It was a challenge, but it’s fun playing an astronaut.”

Still showing in select cinemas across the Philippines, Life is distributed by Columbia Pictures, local office of Sony Pictures Releasing International.

Rebecca Ferguson must contend with alien creature in sci-fi horror ‘Life’

Coming off The Girl on the Train and Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation, Rebecca Ferguson now stars as a feisty scientist in Columbia Pictures’ terrifying thriller, Life.

Also starring Jake Gyllenhaal and Ryan Reynolds, Life is about a team of scientists aboard the International Space Station whose mission of discovery turns to one of primal fear when they find a rapidly evolving life form that caused extinction on Mars, and now threatens the crew and all life on Earth.

The film is also about men and women under extreme pressure and facing an unknown, ever changing threat where there’s nowhere to run from it.

“Even though our characters are experts in different areas when that expertise goes over the threshold into human instinct, it’s about what your behaviour is when you are threatened or scared?” explains Ferguson.

The actress plays Miranda North, on loan to the mission from the Centers for Disease Control. By the book and focused on her work, she is there to keep everyone on the crew and back home on Earth healthy – no matter what they encounter in space.

“Miranda is a microbiologist sent up to protect everyone on Earth from whatever this is that we find,” Ferguson says. A rigorous scientist, she has set up multiple firewalls to protect themselves and Earth from possible contamination. “The firewall is, first, the container that the specimen was in. And then the room. And then the station itself. She has to do whatever she can do to protect Earth, because we don’t know what this life form is.”

Ferguson says that each of the characters responds to the moment of discovery – and the threat it represents. “We all have our own relationship to this creature. Some of us love it, we nurture it. Some of us want to kill it off in the beginning. And that creates an incredible tension in the group,” she shares.

Co-star Ryan Reynolds has nothing but praise for Ferguson. “Rebecca is such an incomparable actress in what she is able to say and convey,” comments the Deadpool star. “Her character has a real conflict that she is dealing with throughout the entire film. I would say that the central female character is really the heartbeat of the whole film. She really has to carry a whole burden that none of the other cast members have to carry. And she is so good; she is such an intelligent, emotional and smart actress. It was really a pleasure to watch her work. She does these simple, subtle movements and moments and she just tells everybody everything they need to hear in the most emotional way possible. She is really quite a gifted performer.”

The stunning Golden Globe-nominated European actress first caught the attention of international audiences playing the iconic Queen Elizabeth in the hit BBC/STARZ series The White Queen. For her portrayal of Elizabeth Woodville, Ferguson was nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Actress in a Miniseries or Television Film, and the months that followed established her as an actress to watch.

Still showing across the Philippines, Life is distributed by Columbia Pictures, local office of Sony Pictures Releasing International.

MOVIE REVIEW: Life (2017)

Life (Daniel Espinosa, 2017) ends the brilliant streak of epic space-extra-terrestrial conversations that Gravity, Interstellar, The Martian and Arrival have stirred from the last 4 years.

A group of multinational scientists tests a sample soil from Mars, successfully proving that it contains the first proof of extraterrestrial life through single cell extraction. This leads to a series of unprecedented events of attack as the new-found species turns into a predator for its own survival.

The film has every potential to be a solid space epic, in-your-face extra-terrestrial tale: a very exciting premise, above par visual effects, and a committed ensemble; however, an uninspired screenplay and indecisive direction drag the film down to deep space.

In all fairness, Life boasts thrills but the good part stops there. The film majorly suffers from lack of context and insufficient substance other than the obvious artifice of man vs. alien. Filled with underwritten and one dimensional characters, the screenplay is short of the charm and definitive intelligence as it boxes itself in a textbook-ish narrative filled with jargons and scientific propaganda, making the entire film very emotionally distant for the audience to even care or sympathize for the characters. Furthermore, it is almost impossible to root for the characters as there is almost nothing to hold onto them. They make hasty and irrational decisions from start to finish, solely building to the shock value of the film, completely empty of any human depth.

The entire film feels as if it were a mere elimination game than a genuine survival story as director Daniel Espinosa evidently showcases shock after shock; indecisive whether to go the Cuaron’s Gravity or Aliens vs Predator; or perhaps the cardinal sin of marrying both through its mise en scènes, leading to a messy, incoherent storyline. The atmosphere of the first hour felt so minimalistic, and it leads you feeling that this is going to be one of those art-house space features full of silent moments and engaging characters. However, the director decides to go completely the opposite, as everything startlingly transforms into a monstrous battle story. Juggling the two themes perhaps is ambitious, and will always have the ability to soar high once done with finesse and intellect, but at the same time, will always be bound to a miserable failure if polar elements won’t be hemmed flawlessly – for this occasion, the latter.

The film has respectable performances from Rebecca Ferguson and Jake Gyllenhaal. They are two of the better aspects of the film, but aren’t just enough to truly engage into their journey of nothingness. You can tell from the actors’ commitment that they are boldly determined to nail the film, but having their tour de force talents surrounded by confusion just dilute the power they give.

Overall, Life suffers from the inescapable misfortune of being released in an era fresh from Gravity, Interstellar, The Martian and Arrival, where intelligence and emotional engagement matter more than the surface of excitement and thrills. It showcases nothing new and doesn’t really give much of what we’ve already gotten before.

Now showing across Philippine cinemas, Life is distributed by Columbia Pictures, local office of Sony Pictures Releasing International.

Cause of Mars extinction becomes threat on Earth in horror-thriller ‘Life’

Columbia Pictures’ Life is a terrifying sci-fi thriller about a team of scientists aboard the International Space Station whose mission of discovery turns to one of primal fear when they find a rapidly evolving life form that caused extinction on Mars, and now threatens the crew and all life on Earth.

Directed by Daniel Espinosa (Safe House), Life stars Jake Gyllenhaal, Rebecca Ferguson, Ryan Reynolds, Hiroyuki Sanada, Ariyon Bakare, Olga Dihovichnaya. Produced by David Ellison, Dana Goldberg, Bonnie Curtis, and Julie Lynn. Written by Rhett Reese & Paul Wernick.

The approach to Life was to make a terrifying thriller that feels like it could be in today’s headlines. “This script had such a degree of reality and a feeling of constant tension,” says Ryan Reynolds. “It begins with an air of discovery that turns to a tension that permeates the whole film as we learn more and more about this thing that we’ve put on board the ISS.”

Director Daniel Espinosa says that before he was approached to direct Life, he had given some thought to the ways his filmmaking heroes approached science fiction – Ridley Scott in Alien, Stanley Kubrick in 2001, Andrei Tarkovsky in Solaris. “I think the reason so many great directors have walked into science fiction is to work with the unknown – the fear or fascination with the unknown,” he says. “We live in a world that is quite mundane, but in space, you enter an adventure – you don’t know how it looks, how it feels, what it can do to you, where it is. It doesn’t make a sound. That’s terrifying.”

After reading the script for Life, Espinosa saw a way to draw on the work of those icons and yet make a film that would bear his own personal stamp. “This script felt more like a realistic science fiction – maybe science reality,” he says, noting that scientists have discovered proof of water on Mars, thousands of exoplanets revolving around other stars, and even waking 50,000-year-old microbes that have been hibernating inside crystals.

That gives the movie a sense of urgency, says producer and Skydance CEO David Ellison. “One of the things that was very important early on from the genesis of this project was that you could feel like you could turn on the news and hear that this happened today,” he says.

“We’re not making a film that takes place a hundred years from now,” adds producer Dana Goldberg.“We very much wanted to make a film that felt more like science fact than science fiction.”

“Finding life on other planets is obviously extremely exciting, and I think we could be very close to that,” says Paul Wernick, who co-writes the film with his partner, Rhett Reese. (Reese and Wernick most recently teamed with Life star Ryan Reynolds for the global hit Deadpool.) “I think that grounds the movie.”

It’s an idea that was with the film from its genesis. “Dana and I had an idea around the time period when Mars Curiosity had touched down,” says Ellison. “What if the Curiosity discovered single cell organism life on Mars and brought it back to the ISS for analysis. Then, once it was introduced into an environment that was conducive to life, it started to grow… and what if, in the way that humanity does all of the time, with the best of intentions, it was probed, which turned it hostile. This would fundamentally turn the movie into an incredibly tense, sci-fi horror movie set on the ISS, all at zero gravity.”

Reese and Wernick came up with an idea for a completely original alien creature. “We had a vision for this alien whereby it began as a single-celled organism and then that cell divided many, many times, until it became a multi-cellular, complex organism that was able to navigate its environment,” says Reese. “It’s not a higher intelligence – it’s a combination of cells that are not differentiated. A human body has differentiated cells – muscle cells, nerve cells, blood cells, and all of these cells perform different functions. In this particular alien, every cell performs every bodily function on its own. Every cell is an eye cell, a muscle cell, a nerve cell, and as such, the creature is very, very adaptable.”

“It’s our worst nightmare, and the crew’s worst nightmare,” says Wernick.

Now showing across the Philippines, Life is distributed by Columbia Pictures, local office of Sony Pictures Releasing International.

For Jake Gyllenhaal, searching for ‘Life’ on Mars may be going too far

In Columbia Pictures’ terrifying thriller, Life, Oscar-nominee Jake Gyllenhaal stars as astronaut David Jordan who has the distance and remove of a man who has spent over 473 days on the International Space Station.

No one knows this home better than he does. The new crew members joining him are there using his home in space as a base for their game-changing mission.

Also starring Rebecca Ferguson and Ryan Reynolds, Life is about a team of scientists aboard the International Space Station whose mission of discovery turns to one of primal fear when they find a rapidly evolving life form that caused extinction on Mars, and now threatens the crew and all life on Earth.

The film is directed by Daniel Espinosa, who previously dazzled critics with Safe House. “I think Daniel Espinosa wanted to create a world that was suffocating, in a way,” says Gyllenhaal of his director. “In other movies, you can separate yourself from the reality of what you’re seeing. Daniel wanted to create an environment where everything was truly alive. Not only feeling that from the creature itself, but also truly alive emotionally.”

Gyllenhaal was intrigued not only by the script’s scares, but the larger ideas behind the characters. “It was a beautifully paced, terrifying script. It’s a fun idea – you think you know where it’s going, and then it evolves into something where you really, really don’t,” he says. “The life form is literal, but it’s also an incredible metaphor for what can happen. Curiosity is one of the most important human traits, but I think searching too far can be full of hubris. In that way, the life form is a repercussion for that kind of curiosity.”

While Gyllenhaal was attracted to the project for the script and story itself, he also saw a way to honor a family legacy with his role. “My grandfather was a doctor, and Daniel and I talked about the similarities in my character to my grandfather,” he says. “It’s a bit of an homage to him.”

Jake Gyllenhaal has established himself as one of the finest actors of his generation. With his new production company Ninestories, he is also on his way to becoming a filmmaker of note – sourcing material, developing it from the ground up, collaborating with bold storytellers, and shepherding the projects through release.

In 2014, Gyllenhaal starred in Dan Gilroy’s Nightcrawler, which he also produced. Playing an eccentric loner who finds his calling as an investigative crime journalist who will stop at nothing to get the story, Gyllenhaal received BAFTA, Golden Globe, SAG, Critics’ Choice, and Independent Spirit Award nominations and was recognized as Best Actor citations from numerous critics’ groups.

Working with some of Hollywood’s greatest filmmakers in both independent and studio films, Gyllenhaal starred in Ang Lee’s classic Brokeback Mountain, for which he received an Oscar® nomination and won a BAFTA for Best Supporting Actor; David Ayer’s End of Watch, which placed in several critics’ Top 10 Films of 2012; Jean Marc Vallee’s Demolition; Antoine Fuqua’s boxing drama Southpaw; Baltasar Kormákur’s Everest; Denis Villeneuve’s highly acclaimed films Prisoners and Enemy; Richard Kelly’s cult hit Donnie Darko; Jim Sheridan’s Brothers; Duncan Jones’ Source Code, David Fincher’s Zodiac; Sam Mendes’ Jarhead; John Madden’s Proof; and, most recently, Tom Ford’s Nocturnal Animals, for which he earned a BAFTA nomination.

Opening across the Philippines on Friday, March 24, 2017, Life is distributed by Columbia Pictures, local office of Sony Pictures Releasing International.

WATCH: Sci-fi horror film ‘Life’ terrifies with new extended sneak peek

All muscle, all brain.. 100% terrifying. Watch as the space station crew has its first encounter with a Martian organism in the Extended Sneak Peek of Columbia Pictures’ upcoming horror film, Life.

View the clip below and watch Life in Philippine cinemas starting Friday, March 24, 2017.

Life is a terrifying sci-fi thriller about a team of scientists aboard the International Space Station whose mission of discovery turns to one of primal fear when they find a rapidly evolving life form that caused extinction on Mars, and now threatens the crew and all life on Earth.

Directed by Daniel Espinosa (Safe House), the film stars Jake Gyllenhaal, Rebecca Ferguson, Ryan Reynolds, Hiroyuki Sanada, Ariyon Bakare, Olga Dihovichnaya.

Life is written by Paul Wernick & Rhett Reese (Deadpool) and produced by David Ellison (Star Trek reboot), Dana Goldberg, Bonnie Curtis and Julie Lynn.

Life is distributed by Columbia Pictures, local office of Sony Pictures Releasing International. Use the hashtag #LifeMovie

WATCH: Outer space thriller ‘Life’ shocks with first trailer

Columbia Pictures has just revealed the international trailer of its new sci-fi horror-thriller Life which may be viewed below.

Starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Rebecca Ferguson, Olga Dihovichnaya, Ariyon Bakare, Hiroyuki Sanada and Ryan Reynolds, Life opens across the Philippines in 2017.

Life tells the story of the six-member crew of the International Space Station that is on the cutting edge of one of the most important discoveries in human history: the first evidence of extraterrestrial life on Mars. As the crew begins to conduct research and their methods end up having unintended consequences, the life form proves more intelligent than anyone ever expected.

Directed by Daniel Espinosa (Safe House), Life is written by Paul Wernick & Rhett Reese (Deadpool) and produced by David Ellison, Dana Goldberg, Bonnie Curtis and Julie Lynn.
Executive Producers are Don Granger and Vicki Dee Rock.

Life is distributed by Columbia Pictures, local office of Sony Pictures Releasing International.