‘The Lion King’ (2019) review: Photorealistic Disney remake means no worries

Jon Favreau’s remake of ‘The Lion King’ does not liberate itself from the shackles of the Disney classic but the nostalgia it brings should be enough to make this an easy crowd-pleaser.

On a strict technical level, Disney’s 2019 version of The Lion King counts more as a retelling than a reimagination: the story and dialogues are roughly the same, the well-loved songs are all present, and the iconic scenes are masterfully replicated through cutting edge technology (making the 1994 classic look like a giant storyboard). James Earl Jones even reprises the role of Mufasa, “King of the Pride Rock” (pictured above). Had you seen the original film a day before the screening (yes, I have), the beat per beat similarities will be more evident and you’ll find yourself guessing the next lines.

This sounds good news for those who like to be comforted by the same blanket of emotions, all while revelling in the filmmakers’ technical prowess. Anyway, the classic has already a solid story to begin with, and this remake’s faithful adherence to it does not take away whatever entertainment value The Lion King brings. I can’t blame Disney for not fixing what’s not broken as multi-millions of dollars are at stake here. Jungle Book director Jon Favreau’s first and foremost duty is to not mess it up… even if it’s at the cost of storytelling ambition.

Adventurous souls. Zazu (John Oliver) warns a young Simba (J.D. McCrary) and a young Nala (Shahadi Wright Joseph) not to stray away from the Pride Lands.

That being said, those who couldn’t tolerate watching a practically the same film, will be greatly disappointed. The question of necessity immediately pops into one’s head and terms like “cash-grab” and “blatant rehash” will be thrown around by cynical viewers. Personally, I would rather reserve those terms for films which are lazily done and TLK 2.0 definitely doesn’t look like one. With its photorealistic and painstakingly rendered imagery, the film looks like a high-end feature of Disneynature. For someone who enjoys watching NatGeo documentaries, I am digging this. If anything, audiences will be baffled to know that none of it is actually real—everything is created in digital space. (The term “live action” seems to be a misnomer by now.) The main attraction here is to gawk at the visual wizardry and there’s no shame in that.

Wisdom and tribe loyalty. John Kani plays Rafiki, a wise mandrill who serves as the shaman of the Pride Lands and a close adviser of Mufasa.

Putting realism to the context of animation, however, creates dissonance at some parts and that’s where this remake fails to completely replicate the magic of the original. To be specific, Favreau & Co. sticks to realistic animal expressions: which means that a lion’s sad/angry/confused face won’t be as expressive as their animated counterparts. Hence, even if the vocal performances are all incredible, the emotional range and depth is not fully captured. In a way, 2.0 serves as a reminder why traditional animation is important. The exaggerated facial expressions and the surrealist sequences are used to convey larger than life emotions. The Lion King thrives more in that territory. It can never entirely sell the idea of realism in the first place, as there’s no way in the world that animals talk or sing like people.

But everything else is mostly forgiven when TLK 2.0 starts hitting the nostalgia button via its amusing, sing-along songs, and the sweeping musical score once again provided by the great Hans Zimmer. This remake retains most of the melodies but there are welcome additions too like Beyoncé’s original song “Spirit” which is played during Simba’s eventual return to the Pride Lands. Her character Nala is given more dimension this time and I wish we’re given more time for Donald Glover’s adult Simba to fully grow on us. Nevertheless, the coming-of-age push and pull themes of ‘putting your past behind’ vs. ‘remembering who you are’ are well emphasized in his character building moments. 

The heir of the Pride Lands, Simba (Donald Glover) and his childhood best friend Nala (Beyoncé Knowles-Carter) reunites after several years of separation.

While the opening song “Circle of Life” is a frame by frame recreation of the original, Simba and Nala’s performance of Elton John’s rousing hit “Can You Feel The Love Tonight” is wonderfully set in the warm glow of sunset this time. There’s also a fresh take in Chiwetel Ejiofor’s performance of “Be Prepared” which is delivered as a mix of spoken word/song. Combined with Scar’s scruffy features, the character looks more devious and menacing. 

Usurpers to the throne. Scar (Chiwetel Ejiofor), along with his hyena henchmen Shenzi (Florence Kasumba), Kamari (Keegan-Michael Key), and Azizi (Eric Andre), are onto something evil.

But TLK 2.0 starts to earn its big laughs upon the introduction of Billy Eichner and Seth Rogen’s Timon and Pumbaa. The duo steal the thunder with their nihilistic philosophy of living a worry-free lifestyle and the actors’ seemingly improvisational freedom. Their acapella performance of “The Lion Sleeps Tonight” really lights up the mood of the film. Also bringing levity is John Oliver’s pompous and diplomatic bird Zazu.

Hakuna Matata. A young Simba (J.D. McCrary), meerkat Timon and warthog Pumbaa sing away their problems in ‘The Lion King.’

The Lion King (2019) does not reinvent nor reimagine the story and it does not have to. There’s a reason why the 1994 film is a timeless classic and it’s because of the relevant themes of responsibility, pride and courage. The main goal here is to reintroduce the story to a younger generation who don’t share the same level of enthusiasm towards the old-school Disney animation. In that note, this film succeeds.

The 2019 remake honors what came before. It may lack the surprise factor—the emotional punches and musical cues come as expected—but there’s great pleasure in seeing this classic brought into life. It won’t overthrow my love for the original anytime soon but think of this as a good old, hand-me-down present that’s beautifully wrapped for every generation to keep.

3.5 out of 5 stars
Directed by Jon Favreau, ‘The Lion King’ features the voices of Donald Glover, Seth Rogen, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Alfre Woodard, Billy Eichner, John Kani, John Oliver, Beyoncé Knowles-Carter, JD McCrary, Shahadi Wright Joseph, Florence Kasumba, Keegan-Michael Key, Eric Andre and James Earl Jones. Based on the 1994 Disney classic by Irene Mecchi, Jonathan Roberts and Linda Woolverton. 118 minutes. Rated G.

WATCH: Meet Marvel’s Sorcerer Supreme in first teaser trailer for ‘Doctor Strange’

Doctor Stephen Strange uncovers hidden realms in the very first teaser trailer for Marvel’s “Doctor Strange” which may be viewed below.

Check out the teaser above and see two posters for the film below. Make sure to see “Doctor Strange” when it lands in Philippine theaters November 4!

“Doctor Strange” follows the story of neurosurgeon Doctor Stephen Strange (Cumberbatch) who, after a horrific car accident, discovers the hidden world of magic and alternate dimensions. The film will show audiences corners of the Marvel Cinematic Universe never before explored, thanks to director Scott Derrickson.

“Doctor Strange” stars Benedict Cumberbatch, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Rachel McAdams and Michael Stuhlbarg with Mads Mikkelsen and Academy Award® winner Tilda Swinton.

“Doctor Strange” is the latest film in Phase 3 of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Phase 3’s goal—over the course of four years and nine films—is to introduce audiences to new heroes and continue the adventures of fan favorites.

Marvel’s “Doctor Strange” is produced by Kevin Feige with Louis D’Esposito, Victoria Alonso, Charles Newirth, Stephen Broussard and Stan Lee serving as executive producers.

Based on the Marvel comic character who first appeared in “Strange Tales” Issue #110 published in July 1963, Marvel’s “Doctor Strange” continues the lineage of epic big-screen adventures chronicled in Marvel’s “Iron Man,” “The Incredible Hulk,” “Iron Man 2,” “Thor,” “Captain America: The First Avenger,” “The Avengers,” “Iron Man 3,” “Thor: The Dark World,” “Captain America: The Winter Soldier,” “Guardians of the Galaxy,” “Avengers: Age of Ultron,” “Ant-Man” and the upcoming “Captain America: Civil War,” (April 27, 2016), “Guardians of the Galaxy 2” (May 5, 2017) and “Thor: Ragnarok” (November 3, 2017).

Explore the mystical world of “Doctor Strange” when it hits Philipine theaters on November 4, 2016.

Marvel’s “Doctor Strange” will be distributed in the Philippines by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures through Columbia Pictures. Follow the official social media accounts of Marvel, namely, (FB) MarvelPhilippines, (Twitter) @marvelstudiosph and (Instagram) @marvelphilippines.

MOVIE REVIEW: Triple 9 (2016)

“TRIPLE 9” Review
Directed by John Hillcoat and written by Matt Cook

Triple 9 starts out with a question: What is a Triple 9? For the uninitiated, a Triple 9 is police code for “officer down,” and essentially diverts the majority of the force from any other activity so they can rush to the scene. And that’s exactly what our group of crooks will bank on to pull off a desperate and difficult heist.

Directed by John Hillcoat and written by Matt Cook, the story of Triple 9 revolves around a group composed of dirty cops and ex-military men led by Michael Atwood (Chiwetel Ejiofor), an ex-Special Forces who shares a son with Elena (Gal Gadot), the sister of Irina Vlaslov (Kate Winslet). Irina is the head of a Russian-Israeli mob, which makes Michael’s custody battle for his son quite excruciatingly difficult.

After a heist that they were able to pull off in broad daylight, Irina asks the group to do another job to assist the release of her husband Vasili from prison. After Michael resists, he gets himself and his group the proper motivation to go through with the job after Irina has Russel (Norman Reedus), Michael’s mate back in Special Forces, suffocated with a plastic bag inside his own car—which essentially translates to a very short role for him in the film.

kate winslet in triple 9 movie

The group then proceeds to discuss how they are going to pull off the heist without getting too much trouble from the force. Cops Jorge Rodriguez (Clifton Collins Jr.) and Marcus Belmont (Anthony Mackie) suggest they do a Triple 9, which means that they need to kill one of their own to pull off the heist. Russel’s brother, Gabe (Aaron Paul, who once again channels his Breaking Bad character’s impulsive, damaged, guilt-ridden, methed up persona) is heavily against the plan (he turns out to be an ex-cop), but nevertheless concedes to the majority.

Enters Chris Allen (Casey Affleck), a transfer cop who gets partnered with Marcus. He turns out to be incorruptible and becomes the perfect target for the group’s plan. His mentor and uncle, Jeffrey Allen (Woody Harrelson), also gets thrown into the mix after he becomes the head of the team that investigates the previous heist the group has made.

triple 9 movie 2

For a film that has an all-star cast, Triple 9 falls short on quite a number of things. There’s not much character development and even Gal Gadot’s character is reduced to just a pretty face that shows up on screen from time to time. Chris’ wife, Michelle (Teresa Palmer), barely has any presence on screen, and her only memorable moment was a buttock shot. In fact, the shot was too dark, some people wouldn’t even recognize that it’s Teresa Palmer until you reach the end credits.

The pace of the film seems rushed, and some viewers might exit the theater with more questions that can never really be answered. For one, there is absolutely no mention how Michael has got involved with Elena and the Russian-Israeli mob or how their group was formed in the first place. Likewise, it’s quite incomprehensible why Kate Winslet’s character has to speak in English when her husband explicitly speaks to her in Russian. Rather strange, language-wise.

triple 9 movie 1

Fans of Breaking Bad and The Walking Dead might notice some obvious references to the aforementioned shows, whether it may be intentional or not. Not to spoil anything here, but you’ll pick it up pretty easily if you’re a fan of either show.

At the end of the day, if you’re looking for a gritty action film about people with questionable morals and loyalty, then this film might take the cake. Also, you might want to check your backseat when you get in the car after seeing it. You never know.

American crime thriller drama film Triple 9 is now showing in Philippine cinemas via OctoArts Films International.

triple 9 movie poster

Julia Roberts, torn between revenge and justice in ‘Secret in Their Eyes’

An impeccable cast of winning actors converge in Secret In Their Eyes – Academy Award winners Julia Roberts and Nicole Kidman with Academy Award nominee Chiwetel Ejoifor in a complex tale of love, friendship, betrayal and obsession that has the critics rooting for its lead, Julia Roberts, an award for her stirring performance as a devoted mom and an outstanding investigator whose only daughter was murdered by a young male asset (against terrorism) that the government tries so hard to protect.

Nicole Kidman in THE SECRET IN THEIR EYES
Nicole Kidman in SECRET IN THEIR EYES

Directed by Billy Ray, “Secret In Their Eyes” is inspired by “El Secreto de Sus Ojos,” the Argentinian film that brought home the Oscars for Best Foreign Language Film (2010). Producer Matt Jackson, President of Production at IM Global, says that it’s rare that “you get a script where the story jumps out at you from every page, but also has a very intricate plot involving two different time periods. Billy’s idea to turn the film into a story that had an element of counter terrorism was genius. All of the hysteria and paranoia that was rampant after 9/11 provided a perfect device for setting the killer loose to create such a personal story of obsession and loss.” “When I was writing it I didn’t want to keep 2002 and 2015 apart,” says Billy. “I felt that 2015 had to be an echo of what happened in 2002.”

Julia Roberts who has successfully launched top-grossing worldwide romantic comedy/drama movies such as “Pretty Woman,” “Notting Hill,” “Dying Young,” “Mystic Pizza” and “Steel Magnolias” gives the audience a whole new perspective on her thespian capabilities in “Secret In Their Eyes” as she takes on the role of Jesse Cobb, a grieving mother trapped in her responsibility as a cop to carry out her own kind of justice towards the killer of her daughter.

Director Ray notes, “There are two Jesses in this movie. When we first meet her she is full of life and wildly in love. Something happens to Jess and she becomes another person. These are the two extremes that Julia Roberts plays extremely well. And like the best characters, Jess has secrets. Jess is barely functioning. She froze thirteen years ago and her life just stopped. Her heart kept beating so she kept going to work every day but she was dead. In particular Ray (Ejiofor) is trying to liberate Jess because she’s had this horrible blow and never recovered. To ask an actress to come play that is sort of the ultimate trap because you can just play sadness and never get out of it and then you have a one-note performance.”

Chiwetel Ejiofor and Dean Norris in SECRET IN THEIR YES
Chiwetel Ejiofor and Dean Norris in SECRET IN THEIR EYES

For Julia Roberts the essence of the story is about the evolution of people who were taken off track by destiny. “I was very taken with Billy’s script. I don’t read a lot of scripts that I like and I don’t work very often. But I read this and thought it was truly interesting. “Billy has been remarkable for me as an actor. He’s so available and he’s like Encyclopedia Brown. He knows everything, he’s calm and he’s super-loving. He’s always taking care of all of us in these very fragile scenarios that he’s created. I think he probably feels bad for putting us through all this,” she laughs.

“For me it’s a great opportunity to play almost two different characters over thirteen years. Jess is not the person she was meant to be, the person she was born to be and lived her life to be. She’s not that person anymore. She’s become kind of a shell. I don’t think it’s a void. It’s very sad, but it’s fascinating. It’s a complicated Rubik’s cube to be solved. It’s pretty obvious from the title that everybody is hiding something, but it’s doled out so carefully that everyone is going to be surprised at the end,” says Julia.

Secret In Their Eyes opens December 2, 2015 in theaters as distributed by Axinite Digicinema.

‘The Hunger Games’ writer Billy Ray directs ‘Secret in Their Eyes’

Billy Ray, an Academy Award nominee known for his stirring screenplays of box-office smash hits such as “The Hunger Games,” “Captain Phillips” and “Flightplan” takes director’s seat in Secret In Their Eyes where he has assembled an award-winning cast and for the first time brings together Academy Award winners Julia Roberts and Nicole Kidman with Academy Award nominee Chiwetel Ejiofor.

“Secret in Their Eyes” is based on “El Secreto de Sus Ojos,” the 2010 Academy Award winner for Best Foreign Language Film, directed by Juan Jose Campanella. In the movie, a parent’s worst nightmare happens when investigator Jess Cobb (Roberts) finds her daughter brutally murdered, along with his best pal in the force, Ray Kasten (Ejiofor), the two set out to uncover the elusive killer with the aid of district attorney Claire Sloan (Kidman). Years passed and the killer is still lose on the streets of Los Angeles, beneath the missions, Jess tries hard to cover the pain that has haunted her for years after her daughter’s death.

The movie is also produced by Academy Award winner Mark Johnson (“Rain Man,” “Breaking Bad”) who has known Ray’s works for decades but it’s the first time that Ray and Johnson work for “Secret In Their Eyes.” When they saw the Argentine thriller “El Secreto de Sus Ojos,” neither of them could stop talking about it. “El Secreto de Sus Ojos, is spectacular,” says Billy, “I was completely floored by it, had a reverence for it that bordered on awe. Then Mark asked me if I wanted to adapt it. At first I was hesitant because you don’t want to take on anything that is so great that you feel dwarfed by it before you even start. But I did feel there was an American version of the story worth retelling and exploring.” Every time the pair got frustrated tackling the weighty subject matter, they had an unabashed cheerleader in Juan Campanella, who directed the Argentine film. “Here was a man who wanted to solve a cold case but the reason why he wanted to solve it was not only to find the culprit but to find the root of his own loneliness,” Campanella says. “That to me was very original. Contrary to what people might think, I really like it when somebody takes a piece of work and turns it into something different.” Billy says an impetus for the American version lay in the events of 9/11. ”The horror of that event was so big and so indelible for anybody who was in America at that time. But it created a story opportunity for our movie that no other context could have.” “Billy found a great twist on the story,” Campanella says. “He respected a lot of the emotion of the original but found a very American way of telling it.” Billy admits that he initially thought he was writing a movie about loss. “But it turns out that I was writing a movie about obsession. Stories do that sometimes, they tell you what they are about.

For Julia Roberts the essence of the story is about the evolution of people who were taken off track by destiny. “I was very taken with Billy’s script. I don’t read a lot of scripts that I like and I don’t work very often. But I read this and thought it was truly interesting. “Billy has been remarkable for me as an actor. He’s so available and he’s like Encyclopedia Brown. He knows everything, he’s calm and he’s super-loving. He’s always taking care of all of us in these very fragile scenarios that he’s created. I think he probably feels bad for putting us through all this,” she laughs.

Nicole Kidman says that the plot intrigued her when she first read the script. “Rarely do you get scripts that have three strong protagonists and a really, really strong storyline. I’ve known Billy for a while now and I wanted to work with him and the idea of doing this with Julia and Chiwetel was compelling. “For me writer-directors are the best combination. Billy is so collaborative and he has a great sense of structure and a great sense of humor. He frequently would rewrite or change things a little bit in order to adapt to what Chiwetel and I needed. I call him Professor Billy because he also teaches writing and has so much knowledge of film.”

Secret in their Eyes opens December 2, 2015 in theaters as distributed by Axinite Digicinema.

Marvel’s ‘Doctor Strange’ begins production

Nov. 24, 2015 – Marvel Studios announced today that production has begun on “Doctor Strange,” starring Benedict Cumberbatch (“The Imitation Game,” “Star Trek: Into Darkness”), Chiwetel Ejiofor (“12 Years a Slave,” “The Martian”), Rachel McAdams (“Sherlock Holmes”) and Michael Stuhlbarg (“Steve Jobs”) with Mads Mikkelsen (“Clash of the Titans,” “Casino Royale”) and Academy Award® winner Tilda Swinton (“Michael Clayton”).

The film is directed by Scott Derrickson (“Sinister,” “The Exorcism of Emily Rose”). The film will be shot in several locations around the world, including London, New York, Hong Kong and Kathmandu, Nepal.

“Doctor Strange” follows the story of neurosurgeon Doctor Stephen Strange who, after a horrific car accident, discovers the hidden world of magic and alternate dimensions.

“Doctor Strange” is the latest film in Phase 3 of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Phase 3’s goal—over the course of four years and nine films—is to introduce audiences to new heroes and continue the adventures of fan favorites.
Marvel’s “Doctor Strange” is produced by Kevin Feige with Louis D’Esposito, Victoria Alonso, Charles Newirth, Stephen Broussard and Stan Lee serving as executive producers.

Director Scott Derrickson’s creative team also includes director of photography Ben Davis, B.S.C. (Marvel’s “Avengers: Age of Ultron,” Marvel’s “Guardians of the Galaxy”); production designer Charles Wood (Marvel’s “Avengers: Age of Ultron,” Marvel’s “Guardians of the Galaxy”); costume designer Alexandra Byrne (Marvel’s “Avengers: Age of Ultron,” Marvel’s “Guardians of the Galaxy”); editors Wyatt Smith (“Into the Woods,” Marvel’s “Thor: The Dark World”) and Sabrina Plisco, ACE (“Mr. Magorium’s Wonder Emporium,” “Charlotte’s Web”); and visuals effects supervisor Stephane Ceretti (Marvel’s “Guardians of the Galaxy”).

Based on the Marvel comic character who first appeared in “Strange Tales” Issue #110 published in July 1963, Marvel’s “Doctor Strange” continues the lineage of epic big-screen adventures chronicled in Marvel’s “Iron Man,” “The Incredible Hulk,” “Iron Man 2,” “Thor,” “Captain America: The First Avenger,” “The Avengers,” “Iron Man 3,” “Thor: The Dark World,” “Captain America: The Winter Soldier,” “Guardians of the Galaxy,” “Avengers: Age of Ultron,” “Ant-Man” and the upcoming “Captain America: Civil War,” (May 6, 2016), “Guardians of the Galaxy 2” (May 5, 2017) and “Thor: Ragnarok” (November 3, 2017).

Marvel’s Doctor Strange, which opens in Philippine theaters on November 4, 2016, will be distributed in the Philippines by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures through Columbia Pictures. Follow the official social media accounts of Marvel, namely, (FB) MarvelPhilippines, (Twitter) @marvelstudiosph and (Instagram) @marvelphilippines.

— PRESS STATEMENT FROM WALT DISNEY STUDIOS MOTION PICTURES

Oscars best foreign language film ‘Secret in Their Eyes’ gets 2015 reboot

Academy Award winner Julia Roberts stars in her latest and another yet Oscar-worthy role in the crime thriller Secret In Their Eyes based on the 2010 Academy Award winner for Best Foreign Language Film directed by Juan Jose Campanella “El Secreto de Sus Ojos.”

This year’s “Secret In Their Eyes,” directed by blockbuster filmmaker and Academy Award nominee Billy Ray (“Captain Phillips,” “The Hunger Games”), and produced by Academy Award and Emmy winner Mark Johnson (“Rain Man,” “Breaking Bad”) brings Julia Roberts in a surprising mystery that explores the personal themes of loss, betrayal, and a parent’s undying will to right a profound wrong.

DA investigator Jess Cobb (Julia Roberts), FBI investigator Ray Kasten (Chiwetel Ejiofor), and Deputy District Attorney Claire Sloan (Nicole Kidman) are rising stars, having been selected to serve on an anti-terrorism joint task force in post 9/11 Los Angeles. Jess and Ray are tight-knit partners who share a deep respect and an easy friendship both on the job and off. Ray and Claire come from opposite walks of life, but have a complicated attraction that is a constant undercurrent in their day-to-day encounters. After Ray and Jess are called to investigate a murder scene, they discover the unthinkable — the victim is Jess’s daughter, Caroline. Ray and Jess join forces with Claire to bring the killer to justice. Their mission, however, meets a cold reality when they discover their suspect is a protected federal witness, and is set free. Thirteen years later, despite their attempts to find an even keel to their lives, Ray, Claire and Jess still bear wounds that won’t heal. But when Ray uncovers a new lead, he returns to L.A. to convince Claire to revisit the case. Despite the risk all face by reopening emotional issues — Jess’ life has been in stasis for more than a decade; Ray’s affection for Claire has never waned — they join forces to pursue the killer: this time vowing to take matters into their own hands to avenge Caroline’s brutal murder. None, however, is prepared for the shocking secret that lurks behind the manhunt and illuminates the emotional cost of vengeance and justice.

Billy Ray and Mark Johnson had known each other and each other’s work for decades, but had never worked together. When they saw the Argentine thriller “El Secreto de Sus Ojos,” neither of them could stop talking about it. “El Secreto de Sus Ojos, is spectacular,” says Billy, “I was completely floored by it, had a reverence for it that bordered on awe. Then Mark asked me if I wanted to adapt it. At first I was hesitant because you don’t want to take on anything that is so great that you feel dwarfed by it before you even start. But I did feel there was an American version of the story worth retelling and exploring.” Every time the pair got frustrated tackling the weighty subject matter, they had an unabashed cheerleader in Juan Campanella, who directed the Argentine film.

“Here was a man who wanted to solve a cold case but the reason why he wanted to solve it was not only to find the culprit but to find the root of his own loneliness,” Campanella says. “That to me was very original. Contrary to what people might think, I really like it when somebody takes a piece of work and turns it into something different.” Billy says an impetus for the American version lay in the events of 9/11. ”The horror of that event was so big and so indelible for anybody who was in America at that time. But it created a story opportunity for our movie that no other context could have.” “Billy found a great twist on the story,” Campanella says. “He respected a lot of the emotion of the original but found a very American way of telling it.” Billy admits that he initially thought he was writing a movie about loss. “But it turns out that I was writing a movie about obsession. Stories do that sometimes, they tell you what they are about.

Secret In Their Eyes opens December 2, 2015 in theatres nationwide as released by Axinite Digicinema.

— PRESS STATEMENT FROM AXINITE DIGICINEMA

Secret in Their Eyes - Official Poster