WATCH: Trailer for ‘A Quiet Place Part II’ poses deadlier threats

“There are people out there worth saving.” Check out the first official trailer for Paramount Pictures’ A Quiet Place Part II and watch the film in Philippine cinemas March 2020.

Paramount Pictures presents in association with Michael Bay, a Platinum Dunes / Sunday Night production, a John Krasinski film “A Quiet Place Part II.”  Executive producers Allyson Seeger, Joann Perritano, Aaron Janus; produced by Michael Bay, Andrew Form, Brad Fuller, John Krasinski.

Based on characters created by Bryan Woods & Scott Beck, written and directed by John Krasinski.

A Quiet Place Part II stars Emily Blunt, Cillian Murphy, Millicent Simmonds, Noah Jupe and Djimon Hounsou.

Following the deadly events at home, the Abbott family (Emily Blunt, Millicent Simmonds, Noah Jupe) must now face the terrors of the outside world as they continue their fight for survival in silence. Forced to venture into the unknown, they quickly realize that the creatures that hunt by sound are not the only threats that lurk beyond the sand path.

A Quiet Place Part II is distributed in the Philippines by United International Pictures through Columbia Pictures. #AQuietPlace

WATCH: ‘A Quiet Place Part 2’ unveils trailer tease, poster

Step into a new unknown. Watch the trailer announcement clip for Paramount Pictures’ A Quiet Place Part II starring Emily Blunt.  

The official full trailer coming on January 1, 2020. Check out the teaser poster and first-look image below.

Paramount Pictures presents in association with Michael Bay, a Platinum Dunes / Sunday Night production, a John Krasinski film “A Quiet Place Part II.” Executive producers Allyson Seeger, Joann Perritano, Aaron Janus; produced by Michael Bay, Andrew Form, Brad Fuller, John Krasinski.

Based on characters created by Bryan Woods & Scott Beck, written and directed by John Krasinski.

A Quiet Place Part II stars Emily Blunt, Cillian Murphy, Millicent Simmonds, Noah Jupe and Djimon Hounsou.

Following the deadly events at home, the Abbott family (Emily Blunt, Millicent Simmonds, Noah Jupe) must now face the terrors of the outside world as they continue their fight for survival in silence. Forced to venture into the unknown, they quickly realize that the creatures that hunt by sound are not the only threats that lurk beyond the sand path.

In Philippine cinemas March 2020, A Quiet Place: Part II is distributed by United International Pictures through Columbia Pictures. #AQuietPlace

Emily Blunt shines as iconic nanny in ‘Mary Poppins Returns’

For the role of the iconic, proper, peculiar and enigmatic nanny Mary Poppins in Mary Poppins Returns, the filmmakers had only one person in mind: Emily Blunt.

“Emily is a brilliant actress who is funny, warm, quick-witted and deeply-feeling. She can also really sing and dance,” says the film’s director, Rob Marshall, who had worked with Blunt on Into the Woods. “I get what she does, I get her humor…we’re very simpatico. She created her own version of the character in a very distinctive and special way, which focused more on the eccentric Mary Poppins from the books. I don’t know who else could have played the role besides her, to be quite honest.”

At first, Blunt was flattered and excited to be offered the role, but she felt daunted, too. “[Rob Marshall] presented me the idea of it and he was so excited about it and he really made sure I was aware this was Disney’s most prized possession in many ways, and so he just said, I really want to do it and I only want to do it with you. And I was like, oh my god, like it was just so exciting and flattering and thrilling and scary and everything that I sort of look for in taking on something new.”

The magic of Mary Poppins

Part of the pressure for Blunt was how to create her own Mary Poppins while paying homage to the original version made iconic by Julie Andrews in the 1964 classic Mary Poppins. I had these memories of [the original film] from when I was a child. More about how it made me feel than the details of Julie’s version of her, so that has always stayed with me. But then I’ve read all of the books, and the books, which are set actually in the ’30s which is when our story is set, have a darker, more profound backdrop, and she just leapt off the page. She is so enigmatic and batty and funny and vain and all of these things that were so delightful to play.”

Continues Blunt, “I think we’ve been very careful to pay homage to the original, and yet this is the next chapter and this is my version of her. I do feel that Rob Marshall very much wanted to pay respect to this film that has impacted people in such a big way.”

Blunt saw the original film when she was about six or seven years old. “I was swept away by the magic of it, and of her, and what she could do in turning the mundane into something magical and the kind of joy she infused into these children’s lives. And I think that combination of magic and reassurance has been the thing that is seared into my nostalgia when I think about Mary Poppins.”

Filming Mary Poppins Returns was itself a magical experience for Blunt, who was amazed by the passion and creativity of everyone involved, including Marshall’s decision that visual effects be practically done as opposed to the more modern way of using computers. “This was a completely, practically done, big Hollywood movie – such a throwback to those old movies where you don’t have a lot of CGI. I think we barely had any green screen other than the animation sequences. And people are on wires, we are floating around on wires, and everything from the parrot umbrella that speaks was an animatronic actual umbrella that is not CGI’d….Every set was so beautifully crafted and real and transporting, and I think it just grounded everybody, you know. We all discovered the magic in it.”

Adds Blunt, “Someone just said to me that Mary Poppins, when it first came out, was the great unifier of the time, and I think that’s probably what we need right now. We are in a fragile, disconcerting time, and I think this is a film that’s completely uncynical and as my husband calls it, it’s like a joy bomb. It’s just so moving, and I don’t think there’s anything else like it out there, and I think people don’t even realize how much they might need an experience like this.”

Mary Poppins Returns opens in Philippine cinemas Tuesday, January 8.  Join the conversation online and use the hashtags #MaryPoppinsReturns and #DisneyPH.

About Mary Poppins Returns

In Disney’s “Mary Poppins Returns,” an all new original musical, Mary Poppins is back to help the next generation of the Banks family find the joy and wonder missing in their lives following a personal loss. Emily Blunt stars as the practically-perfect nanny with unique magical skills who can turn any ordinary task into an unforgettable, fantastic adventure and Lin-Manuel Miranda plays her friend Jack, an optimistic street lamplighter who helps bring light—and life—to the streets of London.

“Mary Poppins Returns” is directed by Rob Marshall. The screenplay is by David Magee and the screen story is by Magee & Rob Marshall & John DeLuca based upon the Mary Poppins Stories by PL Travers. The producers are John DeLuca, p.g.a., Rob Marshall, p.g.a. and Marc Platt, p.g.a. with Callum McDougall serving as executive producer. The music score is by Marc Shaiman and the film features all new original songs with music by Shaiman and lyrics by Scott Wittman and Shaiman.

The film also stars Ben Whishaw as Michael Banks; Emily Mortimer as Jane Banks; Julie Walters as the Banks’ housekeeper Ellen; Pixie Davies, Nathanael Saleh and introducing Joel Dawson as the Banks’ children, with Colin Firth as Fidelity Fiduciary Bank’s William Weatherall Wilkins; and Meryl Streep as Mary’s eccentric cousin, Topsy. Angela Lansbury appears as the Balloon Lady, a treasured character from the PL Travers books and Dick Van Dyke is Mr. Dawes, Jr., the retired chairman of the bank now run by Firth’s character.

Emily Blunt’s unwavering maternal force in horror film ‘A Quiet Place’

Emily Blunt (Looper, Edge of Tomorrow, Sicario) takes on the role of a post-apocalyptic wife and mother, in Paramount Pictures’ new horror thriller A Quiet Place (now playing in Philippine cinemas).

In the modern horror thriller A Quiet Place, a family of four must navigate their lives in silence after mysterious creatures that hunt by sound threaten their survival. If they hear you, they hunt you.

Early on, director and screenwriter John Krasinski gave his wife Emily Blunt——his draft of the script for A Quiet Place. As soon as she read it, she suggested they play the roles of Lee and Evelyn Abbott together, adding a layer of stark realism and candid tenderness that wouldn’t otherwise be possible.

“What I fell in love with in the screenplay is that I felt it touched on some of my deepest fears as a mother of not being able to protect your children. The stakes are so sky-high in this story I was racing to read to the end,” recalls Blunt. “Ironically, before I read the script, I had suggested to John that a friend of mine might be right for the role of Evelyn. But as I read, I thought, ‘never mind that, I need to play this role.’ I just loved the depth and beauty of the story, which goes beyond the horror movie atmosphere. And John and I had never worked together so that was exciting.”

Emily Blunt plays Evelyn Abbott in A QUIET PLACE, from Paramount Pictures.

Once it was agreed that Blunt would play Evelyn, she and Krasinski couldn’t stop talking about the Abbott family—about who Lee and Evelyn were before everything changed and how the catastrophic times they are facing has changed them.

“It’s a very weighty world but they try to stay focused on raising their family,” emphasizes Blunt. “They are constantly afraid. And they’re also a family dealing with a lot of grief and guilt. What I find fascinating is that there’s such an urgent need for them to communicate, yet communicating is so hard in a world where sound is danger.”

Blunt also wanted to explore Everlyn as a kind of unwavering maternal force. “I see her as just spectacularly loving and nurturing,” Blunt describes. “She has this drive to make sure she still raises good children. So she perseveres with school lessons, with making jokes with her kids in any way she can, with loving them and holding them, sometimes just drinking them in, yet wanting them also to have the room to become who they are.”

From the start, the screenwriters had inserted a fear-provoking twist into the story for Evelyn: her greatest joy, the fact that she and Lee are expecting another child, has come at a moment of peak endangerment.

Diving into Evelyn’s unusual circumstances, Blunt knew she would be roiling with split emotions over her impending labor. “Of course, she and Lee are thrilled … but their excitement is tempered by a deep fear. There are so many unanswered questions: How are we going to survive with a baby? How can you even give birth without making sound? What happens when the baby cries? They try to take every precaution they can think of by creating the soundproof safe room and finding creative ways to keep the baby quiet. But they also know they’re leaping into the great unknown.”

It was also a leap into the great unknown for Blunt and Krasinski, taking on these roles having never worked together professionally before. Both found that it only strengthened their bond. “I felt so valued by John creatively,” sums up Blunt. “I’ve always felt valued as his wife and mother of his kids, but this was about discovering that we could be on the same creative page. We were definitely nervous about it and it was a bit scary, but it turned out to be amazing.”

A Quiet Place is distributed in the Philippines by United International Pictures through Columbia Pictures.

MOVIE REVIEW: A Quiet Place (2018)

Anchored by exponentially gripping performances, and a direction that navigates the audience to untouched paradigms of horror, A Quiet Place is a cathartic genre-film that welcomes John Krasinski to a lineup of masterful contemporary directors.

The film uses its chilling silence to draw the audience in, and it grips you so tightly with its eerie quietness, with every jolt of sudden sound will make your nerves erupt. Sound is perhaps the main character of the film, acting both as the protagonist and the villain. Its absence is a mere relief, yet the anticipation of every incoming soundbite brings uncanny tension that seems to be unstoppable from start to finish. Krasinski used the character of sound to create an unsettling friction throughout the movie, making it an unnerving experience other than just a regular film viewing. The audience is involved all throughout. The stillness of the movie’s narrative aims to pull the viewers in a magnetic field of terror. It grabs you by the neck, and it won’t let you go.

Recent horror films like Get Out, Don’t Breathe and Cloverfield have introduced a new wave of the genre that doesn’t just aim to give a fright. These trailblazers to the genre have revamped succeeding horror films into stylish, full-bodied, socially relevant commentaries that unmask the dark layers of reality. A Quiet Place is no exception in the continuance of that conversation.

Epitomizing Undertones: The Prey and the Predator

Get Out didn’t really have undertones — it was quite an in-your-face punch to white supremacy. Don’t get me wrong — it worked beautifully. However, the bliss of A Quiet Place is that every commentary is layered in metaphors that come unexpected. From the entrapment of children (a subtle strike to pedophilia to underage preys), to Emily Blunt’s disturbing labor scene (which denotes silencing harassment), the movie perfectly embraces the purpose of undertones on film.

In an era where our political climate seemed to be unraveling, particularly sexual offenders and predators, the noise of testimonies from both men and women who have been victims of these acts are starting to spew out. Naturally, to protect these crime instigators, silencing their victims has been a very popular trend for the past few decades. Parallel to the film, its main theme is “stay quiet to survive.” In reality, these victims have been silenced to still have a continuous way of life — the validation of their careers; the acceptance from their peers; and most importantly, the preservation of their self-respect. It has been criminally normalized that coming out from these claims will end whatever that is left of you, as if having a voice to assert your right to justice connotes to the stigma of ending your own life. The film is a reflection of that preposterous, yet equally relevant reality.

Anatomy of a Scene: Giving Birth in the Bathtub

In lieu to the abovementioned political undertones that the film possesses, it was perfectly epitomized in the scene where Emily Blunt undergoes labor, and eventually gives birth in the bathtub; needless to say, while keeping her mouth shut in silence in order to save herself and her unborn child. An impossible thing to do, Blunt struggles and fights to endure the pain in quiet terror.

Giving birth is perhaps the most raw, intimate, and personal event a woman’s body could undergo. Fighting against the excruciating pain is not just a torture to a woman’s physiological reflex of release, but also a violation to a human’s dire need to be vulnerable at a time that calls for vulnerability — all for the goal to “stay quiet to survive.” Blunt’s petrified face whilst in labor as the monster lurks around the corner is a classic archetype of predators passively silencing their victims to fight for their lives.

Emily Blunt gives a career-defining performance as a mother whose strength and vulnerability bask the audience, catapulted by a direction meant to highlight her exquisite dramatic techniques. Her labor scene is perhaps one of the most iconic moments of any horror films to date. A bold statement: the performance will stand the test of time, and will be recognized by guilds of accolades even with such an early release, similar to that of Daniel Kaluuya in Get Out. This needs serious consideration for later this year’s awards.

In a nutshell, A Quiet Place didn’t need a spoken word to stir a triumph of emotions — terror, love for family, hope, and the pivotal battle to survive. An avant garde direction that gives another meaning to the household of new wave horror films, and a perfectly orchestrated performance by a committed cast are all it needed. There’s simply nothing like this in the history of horror filmmaking.


5 out of 5 stars


Thank you, Director’s Club and SM Cinema, for the invite to see A Quiet Place!

Book your tickets through the new website, http://www.smcinema.com or for an even more convenient experience, get the SM Cinema mobile app. Stay tuned to SM Cinema on Facebook and @SM_Cinema on Instagram for more information.

WATCH: ‘A Quiet Place’ raises up the terror in new trailer

Those who have survived, live by one rule. Never make a sound. Watch the new trailer for Paramount Pictures’ A Quiet Place starring Emily Blunt and John Krasinski.

In the modern horror thriller A Quiet Place, a family of four must navigate their lives in silence after mysterious creatures that hunt by sound threaten their survival. If they hear you, they hunt you.

John Krasinski directed and co-stars in the film alongside Emily Blunt, Noah Jupe and Millicent Simmonds.

The Executive Producers are Celia Costas, John Krasinski, Allyson Seeger and Aaron Janus. The film is produced by Michael Bay, p.g.a. Andrew Form, p.g.a. Brad Fuller, p.g.a.

Story by Bryan Woods & Scott Beck, and screenplay by Bryan Woods & Scott Beck and John Krasinski.

In Philippine cinemas this April, A Quiet Place is distributed in the Philippines by United International Pictures through Columbia Pictures.

Disney reveals first-look of ‘Mary Poppins Returns’ starring Emily Blunt

Walt Disney Pictures has revealed the first look at Mary Poppins Returns, the sequel to the beloved 1964 musical classic that starred Julie Andrews and Dick Van Dyke.

Based on the Mary Poppins stories by P.L. Travers, Mary Poppins Returns comes from a screenplay by Life of Pi scribe David Magee, with Oscar-winning Chicago and Into the Woods director Rob Marshall at the helm.

The film stars Emily Blunt in the title role, with Ben Whishaw, Emily Mortimer, Julie Walters, Lin-Manuel Miranda and Meryl Streep.

Mary Poppins Returns is set in 1930s depression-era London (the time period of the original novels) and is drawn from the wealth of material in PL Travers’ additional seven books. In the story, Michael (Ben Whishaw) and Jane (Emily Mortimer) are now grown up, with Michael, his three children and their housekeeper, Ellen (Julie Walters), living on Cherry Tree Lane. After Michael suffers a personal loss, the enigmatic nanny Mary Poppins (Emily Blunt) re-enters the lives of the Banks family, and, along with the optimistic street lamplighter Jack (Lin-Manuel Miranda), uses her unique magical skills to help the family rediscover the joy and wonder missing in their lives. Mary Poppins also introduces the children to a new assortment of colorful and whimsical characters, including her eccentric cousin, Topsy (Meryl Streep).

Opening across the Philippines in 2018, Mary Poppins Returns is distributed by Walt Disney Studios Philippines.

Emily Blunt has depression, delusions in ‘The Girl on the Train’

Once it was announced that DreamWorks Pictures was casting “The Girl on the Train,” the film adaptation of the Paula Hawkins’ runaway best-selling novel, the role of Rachel Watson became a much-sought-after part. As there are not scores of enviable female-leading roles in Hollywood that represent fully developed and complex characters like Rachel, the calls for consideration were coming in all over. When the dust settled, only one name rose to the top: Emily Blunt.

The Golden Globe Award-winning actress’ versatility has shone in a wide range of roles in such films as the comedy The Devil Wears Prada and the drama The Young Victoria to actioners including Edge of Tomorrow and Sicario. “Emily has tremendous skill as an actor, and she was our first choice,” lauds producer Marc Platt, who had previously worked with Blunt on the adaptation of Stephen Sondheim’s musical Into the Woods. “We felt that she not only had the skill required, but in all of her characters, there’s something innately relatable. Rachel is very hard on herself, drinks heavily and is destructive in her behavior. Emily has the ability to play all those colors and complexities and darkness but still remain likable, understandable and accessible.”

Author Paula Hawkins professed her excitement for the casting, noting, “Emily couldn’t be more perfect,” and Blunt’s director had nothing but raves as well. “She is Rachel in a stunning way,” lauds director Tate Taylor. Even though the story’s setting has moved across the pond, Taylor insisted that the British performer keep her accent. “It added to the loneliness and isolationism to have a person from the U.K. stuck without a life or a husband in America, and Emily pulls it off fabulously. Audiences will be blown away by her performance.”

In the film, Rachel, who is devastated by her recent divorce, spends her daily commute fantasizing about the seemingly perfect couple who live in a house that her train passes every day, until one morning she sees something shocking happen there and becomes entangled in the mystery that unfolds.

Blunt first became aware of the phenomenon that was “The Girl on the Train” through her sister, Felicity, who is a literary agent. “She told me, ‘This book is selling like quick fire.’ I’d go into any airport or bookstore and saw that it was the No. 1 bestseller. I could see people reading it on the subway and on airplanes. So I was aware of the tsunami of interest before I was approached by the producers. When they asked if I was interested in coming in, that’s when I read the book. And I read it in two days.”

The performer admits that she was struck by just how visceral she found the thriller to be, and grew further impressed with screenwriter Erin Cressida Wilson’s work on the script about this “delusional Nancy Drew character,” as she puts it. “I loved seeing the screenplay capture Rachel’s intensity, and the fact that it is told in a sort of blurry sense…because the lead character is an alcoholic and the most unreliable witness to a crime.

“I was fascinated by how they were filmically going to capture that sense of addiction and voyeurism,” Blunt continues, “what we think we see and don’t, what we think we remember and don’t…and the blurry lines between all of those aspects.” In fact, that commitment to unexpected narrative sold her on the story and the film. “What I loved about the book and about the script is that they articulately managed to depict broken, damaged women. You don’t see that in cinema very often, as women are often held in a male ideal. Both the book and the film strive away from that.”

Blunt is the first to admit that, no matter the genre or motivation, she’ll only approach characters that have an unexpected depth. “All you want is to try and understand the people you play. As the onion unravels with Rachel, you quickly realize she has a drinking problem and is incredibly untethered and unstable,” she shares.

“Rachel’s riddled with guilt, loneliness and desperation, as well as the need for love and connection, and she finds a great deal of comfort and solace in the people she obsesses over. They seem like a match made in heaven, and they know a love she no longer has in her life,” concludes Blunt. “I have huge empathy for her.”

Opening across the Philippines on October 5, 2016, “The Girl on the Train” is distributed by United International Pictures through Columbia Pictures.

‘The Girl on the Train’ – from best-selling novel to movie

Based on author Paula Hawkins’ best-selling novel, the thriller that has riveted millions now makes its way to the big screen in DreamWorks Pictures’ provocative tale, “The Girl on the Train.” Emily Blunt leads the all-star cast which includes Rebecca Ferguson, Haley Bennett, Justin Theroux, Luke Evans, Allison Janney, Edgar Ramirez and Lisa Kudrow, under the direction of Tate Taylor (“The Help”).

Although former journalist Paula Hawkins had previously written several books as an author for hire, “The Girl on the Train” was the first novel released under her own name. After its publication in January 2015, Hawkins’ story became one of the fastest-selling novels in history, with more than 15 million copies sold globally. In its first week, “The Girl on the Train” landed in the top spot of The New York Times Best Sellers List. In fact, it remained on the list for more than a year, spending much of that time at No. 1. In 2015, it became Amazon’s Best Seller in Books, Most Wished for in Books, as well as its Best Seller in eBooks, while Hawkins was lauded by USA Today as Author of the Year.

The inspiration for her gripping whodunit of witnesses who become suspects was inspired by Hawkins’ daily experiences on the commuter rail through London. “There was one particular route where the train was always breaking down, and I would sit and look into these apartment blocks, and you could see right into someone’s living room,” she recounts. “I was always hoping I’d see something interesting, although I never did. But it started my imagination going, and that’s where the germ of the story came from.”

Told from the perspective of three women, the book’s primary narrator is Rachel, a thirtysomething commuter on British Rail whose life is a wreck after a failed marriage. While her drinking cost Rachel her job, she continues to take the train into the city, in order to give the impression to her roommate she’s still working. But Rachel also enjoys obsessing upon the lives of others, while furtively sipping liquor from a water bottle.

In Hawkins’ tale, Rachel’s plunge into the depths of alcoholism clouds her memories. It also fuels her growing paranoia when her investigation into someone’s disappearance points to the chance that she may have been involved. “That’s when we start to discover that Rachel isn’t particularly reliable at all, and she’s got all these problems that suck her into the story,” says Hawkins. “Her memory loss is key to her sense of who she’s become. She has a twisted sense of guilt and responsibility because she doesn’t remember her actions.” Still Hawkins advises, her protagonist is strong underneath the drama. “Over the course of the book, we see her fight back.”

Producer Marc Platt describes why he knew Hawkins’ novel would be perfect material for a filmic adaptation: “It had genre elements of a thriller, and yet it felt contemporary, full of interesting, flawed characters. We’re all a bit voyeuristic, so the notion of riding a train every day and being one of the people in the crowd, and observing a life—and then all of sudden seeing something wrong in that view—is very Hitchcockian, very Rear Window, which is a great hook.”

But to Platt—and the millions of other readers who continue to devour Hawkins’ story—the book is so much more than a tantalizing, sexually charged mystery. “In addition to having thrills, it’s a satisfying character journey,” he states. “Ultimately, it’s about a character who renews herself and repairs her brokenness.”

Platt understood the translation from book to script would be a challenging one indeed. “[Screenwriter] Erin Cressida Wilson’s take on the material was interesting, and she delivered,” he commends. “It is very much taken from the book, so fans will be satisfied, but Erin also found a way to enhance and embellish elements to make the language of it even more cinematic…yet retain the integrity of the source.”

As the screenwriter adapted Hawkins’ work, she felt that the author hit something in the zeitgeist about what makes us all so very human. “With longing, your lover never lets you down by being boring; they’re whatever you make them up to be,” reflects Wilson. “Rachel’s longing for the perfect lives of the young couple she sees from the train is something many can relate to, especially with the rise of social media, where everyone’s family is beautiful and always happy. We look at people’s relationships and think they’re perfect.” She pauses. “But there are so many things we just don’t see.”

Opening across the Philippines on October 5, 2016, “The Girl on the Train” is distributed by United International Pictures through Columbia Pictures.

‘The Girl on the Train’ peeks through window in new poster

Emily Blunt’s character, Rachel, gazes out the window from her seat on the train in the newly released poster art from DreamWorks Pictures’ and Universal Pictures’ “The Girl on the Train.”

The tagline asks ominously, “What Did She See?”

A powerhouse cast led by Emily Blunt, Rebecca Ferguson, Haley Bennett, Justin Theroux, Luke Evans, Allison Janney, Edgar Ramirez and Lisa Kudrow stars in “The Girl on the Train.”

the girl on the train movie

Based on Paula Hawkins’ bestselling novel that shocked the world, “The Girl on the Train” is directed by Tate Taylor (“The Help”) and adapted for the screen by Erin Cressida Wilson.

In the thriller, Rachel (Blunt), who is devastated by her recent divorce, spends her daily commute fantasizing about the seemingly perfect couple who live in a house that her train passes every day, until one morning she sees something shocking happen there and becomes entangled in the mystery that unfolds.

The film is produced by Marc Platt (“Bridge of Spies,” “Into the Woods”); the executive producers are Jared LeBoff and Celia Costas.

Opening across the Philippines on October 5, 2016, “The Girl on the Train” is distributed by United International Pictures through Columbia Pictures.