Meet Hank, Dory’s cranky new friend in ‘Finding Dory’

In Disney-Pixar’s Finding Dory, Dory, Marlin and Nemo embark on a new adventure—this time to the California coastline—on an uncertain search for the family Dory thinks she left behind. Their journey leads them to the Marine Life Institute (MLI), where they meet a diverse array of sea creatures.

In the journey to the MLI, Dory finds herself separated from Marlin and Nemo, and must rely on her own intuition—as well as a host of colorful characters, appealing to each of them to help her on her quest. Foremost of them is Hank, a disgruntled octopus voiced by “Modern Family’s” Ed O’Neill, who was tapped to bring Dory’s chief wingman to life. “He doesn’t like anybody and just wants to be left alone,” O’Neill shares.

“We realized that Dory needed a foil,” says director Andrew Stanton. “Dory was created in the first movie as a surrogate for Nemo. Marlin’s emotional journey to be a better parent called for a character like Dory to test him. Kids—and Dory—are very in the moment; they don’t think about the future too much. They take risks and have fun.

“For this film,” Stanton continues, “we needed a surrogate Marlin. Hank is a curmudgeon, an introvert. He really doesn’t want to be healed and sent back out to the ocean. He’d prefer a solitary existence inside an aquarium tank, so he’s trying to get himself into a more permanent installation.”

“Hank is smart, set in his ways and very cranky,” says Ellen DeGeneres, the voice of Dory. “He’s not happy where he is, while Dory is always happy wherever she is. There’s a great juxtaposition between these two; they’re complete opposites. It’s a great pairing because she is so innocent, yet pushes him to open his mind. They’re both fearful—though Dory doesn’t realize it. She just keeps swimming.”

Hank is actually a “septopus”: he lost a tentacle—along with his sense of humor—somewhere along the way. But Hank is just as competent as his eight-armed peers. An accomplished escape artist with camouflaging capabilities to boot, Hank is the first to greet Dory when she finds herself in the Marine Life Institute. But make no mistake: he’s not looking for a friend. Hank is after one thing: a ticket on a transport truck to a cozy Cleveland facility, where he’ll be able to enjoy a peaceful life of solitude.

“Hank tests Dory,” says Stanton. “He questions her optimism, her bravery. He brings out the best in her, and she does the same for him. He’s reluctantly kind. He has a heart of gold that Dory seems to sense from the start.”

Filmmakers deliberately developed Hank’s personality to contrast Dory’s bright disposition. “We can get a lot of comedy out of pairing opposites,” says co-director Angus MacLane. “Hank is actively trying to get away from connection, while Dory is striving to make one.”

“Hank would be happy living out his days in a secure aquarium all by himself,” says Max Brace, story supervisor for the film. “He’d do anything to avoid going back to the ocean—even if it means escorting Dory through the Marine Life Institute.”

“They need each other,” says O’Neill. “Hank never thought he could make friends, but he’s slowly drawn in by Dory’s charm. Through a lot of adventure, danger and fear, they bond. They become friends through their experiences.”
Stanton says O’Neill captured the character perfectly. “His voice carries that duality of curmudgeon and softie,” says the director. “Ed nailed that in one way in ‘Married with Children’ and an entirely different way in ‘Modern Family.’ We never thought of anybody else.”

O’Neill, who voiced a character in Disney’s “Wreck-It Ralph,” says the key is having an open mind. “There isn’t really a way to prepare for animation,” he says. “I did do one thing: I Googled ‘mimic octopus’ and found this creature I didn’t even know existed. There are several different types of octopus, I learned. The one I’m playing is a shape-shifter. It’s crazy.”

Finding Dory is still showing in cinemas nationwide. It is distributed in the Philippines by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures International through Columbia Pictures. 

MOVIE REVIEW: Finding Dory (2016)

“Finding Dory” Review
Written and Directed by Andrew Stanton and Angus MacLane

One of the most anticipated sequels of the 2016, Finding Dory takes us back to the lives of beloved characters Dory (Ellen DeGeneres), Marlin (Albert Brooks), and Nemo (Hayden Rolence), a year after they crossed the ocean to rescue Nemo from a horrid and mundane fate: living it out in a dental office’s aquarium. Dory now lives right next door to Marlin and Nemo’s anemone home, and has established herself as that kind of family friend (the kind that just shows up unexpectedly). She has become so familiar, Nemo has to warn Dory that anemones sting other fish, but Dory seems to revel in her ignorance.

Andrew Stanton and Angus MacLane’s writing team stuck to the formula that made its predecessor a classic: focused on a kind of loss that emboldens you to cross the ocean (quite literally) to regain whatever it is you lost. If it was Nemo before, it’s Dory’s family and memories of her family now.

The film is essentially an origin story for the forgetful Pacific Blue Tang, and how she ended up meeting Marlin in the first place. She has a tendency to lose her memories immediately anyway; but her being able to recollect memories long forgotten drives her to do something about it, lest she forget again.

A smattering of new supporting characters are also introduced to liven up the story even more than it already is: sea lion mates Fluke (a deep and gravelly Idris Elba) and Rudder (Dominic West), tank neighbours Destiny (Kaitlin Olson) and Bailey (Ty Burrell), and breakout character Hank (Ed O’Neill), a selfish, grumpy, self-loathing octopus scared of the open ocean and bitter about losing an arm (Dory’s relentless persuasion of him being a septopus instead of an octopus didn’t help, either). Flexible enough to slither (and scale hanging structures) along the ground and capable to change his colour and texture to blend anywhere, Hank is not only entertaining, he also ends up becoming an unexpected bestfriend to our favourite Blue Tang (and I’ll never get tired of seeing him in stroller).

As it is, one of the most thought-provoking aspects of the film is the relationship Dory had with her parents Charlie (Eugene Levy) and Jenny (Dian Keaton). Growing up as a fry with short-term memory and a speech impediment, the film once again shows the challenges of taking care of a child with special needs or disability (Nemo, in fact, is a comparable to a child with one shriveled arm). It’s not something everyone can relate to, but it’s still quite evident, and pulls at the heartstrings a bit too strong.

Finding Dory is not as fresh as the first, but understandable due to the fact that as a sequel, it simply follows a tried-and-tested formula (compared to the risk of the first movie, which could’ve bombed for all we know). Its saving grace though is the wonderfully talented wring pool Pixar has in its studios, making the story happy and poignant, calming and thought-provoking, all at the same time. It’s like Beef Rendang. It almost has everything, but doesn’t feel spoilt. The harmony of so many things combined together, without the chaos. In the end, it’s worth a watch. And it’s worth every peso.

Filipino sketch artist for ‘Finding Dory’ comes home

MANILA, June 20, 2016 – Paul Abadilla, the US-based Filipino animator from Pixar Animation Studios received a warm homecoming welcome by his family and animation fans in Manila, Philippines. Parallel to the story of Dory finding her way home in the new Pixar film, “Finding Dory” — Abadilla made his way home to share more about the work he did on the film, which opened here on June 16th.

Joined by some of his own family who are still living the Philippines, the Manila-born artist attended the premiere of “Finding Dory” last Saturday, June 11 at SM Megamall. Abadilla also took time out to conduct an Animation workshop, attended by over 250 animation students and influencers last Tuesday June 14 at Makati Diamond Residences. Attendees also received autographed “Finding Dory” concept art.

“It’s great to be home to be with my family and I feel privileged to be given the opportunity to come back and share what we did for Finding Dory. This is an unforgettable experience and I am very moved by the warm reception I’ve received so far,” said Abadilla.

finding dory paul abadilla

 

Abadilla shared how he started his career in animation, the obstacles he had to go through, and his journey at Pixar. The workshop was followed by a Q&A session where local animation students got a chance to seek Abadilla’s expertise in the animation field.

Abadilla joined Pixar Animation Studios as an intern in June 2008. He continued on as a sketch artist in several art departments doing shading and set design on the feature films “Monsters University,” and Academy Award®-winning films “Brave” and “Inside Out.” In addition, Abadilla has worked on the short films “The Blue Umbrella,” Pixar’s first television special “Toy Story of TERROR!,” “LAVA,” the Academy Award®-nominated “Sanjay’s Super Team and most recently Finding Dory.”

As a sketch artist, Abadilla collaborates with film directors, production designers, art directors, and various technical departments to produce the best design solutions for various CG elements used in the film. His versatile skill set allows him to contribute in many aspects of the pipeline, including designing environments, surface textures, and color and lighting.

Born in Manila, Philippines, Abadilla moved to California at age 7, and was raised in Milpitas and San Jose, Calif. He graduated from San Jose State University, Summa Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Animation and Illustration. Prior to joining Pixar, he interned with the Walt Disney Animation Studios as part of the visual development department.

 

‘Finding Dory’ finds glory at No. 1, grosses P101.7-M in 4 days in PH

MANILA, June 20, 2016 – Disney-Pixar’s “Finding Dory” brought its big-hearted optimism to the Philippine box-office and swam away with P101.7-M in only four days, shattering the biggest opening weekend record for a Disney-Pixar film. This was announced today by a spokesman of Walt Disney Studios Philippines which distributed the film.

“Dory’s” four-day opening weekend figure smashed the previous record of 2015’s “Inside Out” (at P97.2-M) for highest opening weekend for a title released by either Walt Disney or Pixar.

The opening day gross (P10.3-M) of “Finding Dory” last June 16th now also holds the crown for the biggest first-day take for any Walt Disney and Pixar movie.

The sequel to 2003’s “Finding Nemo,” “Dory” arrived in local cinemas with fervent audience anticipation, unanimous critical approval and a unique marketing push with the Manila visit of Filipino animator Paul Abadilla who worked on the film as Set Artist.

In the U.S., family audiences turned out in droves, propelling “Finding Dory” to a massive $136.2 million debut and establishing a new record for an animated film opening.

Its opening weekend results sailed past the previous high-water mark for an animated film — “Shrek the Third’s” $121.6 million launch in 2007 — and ranks as the second-best June debut, behind “Jurassic World’s” $208.8 million bow. Overseas, “Finding Dory” added another $50 million to its haul from 29 international markets, including Australia, Argentina, Russia and China, where its $17.5 million debut ranks as the biggest ever for a Pixar release.

Back in the Philippines, SM Megamall (P2.60-M), SM Mall of Asia (P2.44-M) and Trinoma (P2.26-M) racked up the largest share of box-office receipts, followed by SM North EDSA (P1.86-M), Eastwood (P1.38-M), Power Plant (P1.31-M), Alabang Town Center (P1.29-M), Shang Cineplex (P1.16-M), SM Marikina (P1.15-M) and SM Marikina (P1.12-M).

Also performing above expectations were Glorietta 4 (P1.10-M), Greenhills (P992,700), SM Cebu (P945,900), SM Southmall (P903,700), Greenbelt III (P878,100), Robinsons Magnolia (P834,000), Robinsons Galleria (P804,700), SM Fairview (P770,500), Bonifacio High Street (P762,000) and SM Seaside (P726,500).

Disney•Pixar’s “Finding Dory” welcomes back to the big screen everyone’s favorite forgetful blue tang Dory (voice of Ellen DeGeneres), who’s living happily in the reef with Marlin (voice of Albert Brooks) and Nemo (voice of Hayden Rolence). When Dory suddenly remembers that she has a family out there who may be looking for her, the trio takes off on a life-changing adventure across the ocean to California’s prestigious Marine Life Institute, a rehabilitation center and aquarium. In an effort to find her mom (voice of Diane Keaton) and dad (voice of Eugene Levy), Dory enlists the help of three of the MLI’s most intriguing residents: Hank (voice of Ed O’Neill), a cantankerous octopus who frequently gives employees the slip; Bailey (voice of Ty Burrell), a beluga whale who is convinced his biological sonar skills are on the fritz; and Destiny (voice of Kaitlin Olson), a nearsighted whale shark. Deftly navigating the complex innerworkings of the MLI, Dory and her friends discover the magic within their flaws, friendships and family.

“Finding Dory” is distributed in the Philippines by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures International through Columbia Pictures.

Like us on Facebook, WaltDisneyStudiosPH; follow us on Twitter, @disney_phil; follow us on Instagram, @disney.ph and use the hashtag #FindingDoryPH.

Ellen DeGeneres returns to voice blue tang in ‘Finding Dory’

Dory is a bright blue tang with a sunny personality. She suffers from short-term memory loss, which normally doesn’t upset her upbeat attitude—until she realizes she’s forgotten something big: her family, in Disney-Pixar’s “Finding Dory.” Of course, she’s found a new family in Marlin and Nemo, but she’s haunted by the belief that someone out there is looking for her.

Ellen DeGeneres was called on to provide her iconic voice to the lauded character for Dory’s return to the big screen—something DeGeneres often imagined on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show.” “I was campaigning for a sequel to ‘Finding Nemo’ for 13 years,” says the comedian and talk show host, “but I never imagined it would be ‘Finding Dory.’ So that was the real surprise when I finally got the call.”

DeGeneres’ multiple-Emmy®-winning talk show launched just a few months after “Finding Nemo” opened in theaters, catapulting the comedian to new heights. So when it came time to revisit the character, filmmakers realized a lot had changed since she first gave voice to Dory. But according to director Andrew Stanton, their reunion was just like old times—in more ways than one. “I saw Ellen on the same recording stage at Disney Studios with the same engineer and the same crew as the last day we had worked in 2003. She walked in and we picked up exactly where we had left off.”

The new story features a deeper side of the ever-optimistic fish, challenging DeGeneres to showcase a wide range of emotion. “Doing an animated film is really fun,” she says. “But it can be difficult because every emotion has to come from your voice. You can’t pretend to cry, because that just sounds like you’re pretending to cry. So it’s all real—real conversations, real emotion.”

“To me, Dory was always a tragic character,” says Stanton. “Short-term memory loss just can’t be fun. No matter how much she puts her brave face on and makes the best of an extremely difficult condition, it has to be frustrating and frightening. She has no idea where—who—she comes from.”

Adds screenwriter Victoria Strouse, “I think her cheery personality is her way of compensating for her shortcomings. Her helpfulness works to induce others to stay with her, to ensure she’s never alone. She has a deep fear of being abandoned, and an even deeper fear about her own short-term memory loss and how it might alienate others and cause them to leave her.”

Dory may have trouble recalling exactly what—or who—she’s searching for, but she won’t give up until she uncovers her past and discovers something else along the way: self-acceptance. “In the beginning, she is painfully aware that she requires Marlin and Nemo’s help,” says co-director Angus MacLane. Over the course of the film, she learns to listen to her gut again, accept who she is and her unique way of thinking and living—and that becomes the key to her success.”

“I think people love Dory because there’s not one speck of judgment in her,” adds DeGeneres. “She’s never mean. No matter what she’s faced with, she just carries on. She does what needs to be done.”

“Finding Dory” features an all-star voice cast, welcoming Ellen DeGeneres and Albert Brooks back to the sea as favorite fish Dory and Marlin. Ed O’Neill lends his voice to “septopus” Hank, Kaitlin Olson voices whale shark Destiny, and Ty Burrell gives voice to beluga whale Bailey. Portraying Dory’s parents Charlie and Jenny are Eugene Levy and Diane Keaton. And 12-year-old Hayden Rolence steps in to help bring Nemo to life.

Swimming into Philippine theaters on Thursday, June 16, 2016, “Finding Dory” is distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures International through Columbia Pictures.

Follow the official social media accounts of Disney in the Philippines, namely, (FB) WaltDisneyStudiosPH, (Twitter) @disneystudiosph and (Instagram) @waltdisneystudiosph and use the hashtag #FindingDoryPH.

Sia provides ‘Unforgettable’ music for ‘Finding Dory’

Disney-Pixar’s “Finding Dory” welcomes back to the big screen Dory, friends Marlin and Nemo—and composer Thomas Newman. “To me, he was one of the cast members of ‘Finding Nemo,’” says director Andrew Stanton. “We formed a close relationship ever since, and now that he is behind the score for ‘Finding Dory,’ it fees like the last member of the family has arrived at the reunion.”

According to Stanton, scoring a film like “Finding Dory” with a composer like Newman takes the films to places he has yet to imagine. “It forces me to have to really explain out loud what my intentions are. It can lead to very intense conversation between the two of us. But I get so much out of it. I end up understanding my movie ten times better—it’s almost therapy for me. We just click.”

“There was no way I could not do “Finding Dory,” says Newman, who was nominated for an Oscar® for his work on “Finding Nemo” and won a Grammy® (best song written for motion picture, television or other visual media) on Stanton’s “WALL•E.” “It’s ironic that a movie about fish—some in aquariums, some in open water—has such a huge range of emotive possibilities—from the hysterical to the deeply profound and primally frightening. That’s exciting to ponder musically.”

According to Newman, the score is designed to support the film’s big themes of loss and the characters’ efforts to conquer their individual shortcomings. It also showcases the deeper, less sunny side of Dory’s personality. “Dory’s theme has a certain amount of quirkiness and a certain amount of sadness built in,” says the composer.

The goal, says Newman, is to complement the story. “If there’s humor or pathos, I want to bring it out, but I don’t want to re-describe it. I just want to underline it. I want to make it more of what it already is.

“I liken music to makeup on a face,” continues Newman. “At its worst, it’s garish and overdone. At its best, you don’t notice it and it brings out the best qualities.”

Singer-songwriter Sia is on board “Finding Dory,” performing the film’s end-credit song, “Unforgettable.” (Watch Sia sing “Unforgettable” for the first time at http://youtu.be/fMVlYk6uNB0).

American songwriter Irving Gordon wrote the song in 1951, and in 1992 won a Grammy® for it when Natalie Cole included the tribute to her late father on her album of duets. “Unforgettable” remains revered worldwide today.

Five-time Grammy® nominee Sia agreed to sing the song when the voice of Dory herself made the request. “Dory’s story makes me teary,” says Sia. “When Ellen asked me, I couldn’t refuse!”

Director Andrew Stanton has long been a fan of the native Australian performer. “In the same way Robbie Williams did his own unique twist on a classic song for ‘Finding Nemo,’ Sia captures the soulful truth of the Nat King Cole classic ‘Unforgettable,’ and makes it all her own,” said Stanton. “They are a perfect complement to one another, just like the two films.”

Disney•Pixar’s “Finding Dory” finds Dory living happily in the reef with Marlin and Nemo about a year after their life-changing adventure. When Dory suddenly remembers that she has a family out there who may be looking for her, she recruits Marlin and Nemo for a life-changing adventure across the ocean to California’s prestigious Marine Life Institute (MLI), a rehabilitation center and aquarium.

In the effort to find her mom and dad, Dory enlists the help of three of the MLI’s most intriguing residents: Hank, a cantankerous octopus who frequently gives employees the slip; Bailey, a beluga whale who is convinced his biological sonar skills are on the fritz; and Destiny, a nearsighted whale shark.

Deftly navigating the complex inner workings of the MLI, Dory and her friends discover the magic within their flaws, friendships and family.

“Finding Dory” swims into Philippine theaters on Thursday, June 16, 2016. The film is distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures International through Columbia Pictures.

Follow the official social media accounts of Disney in the Philippines, namely, (FB) WaltDisneyStudiosPH, (Twitter) @disneystudiosph and (Instagram) @waltdisneystudiosph and use the hashtag #FindingDoryPH.

‘Finding Nemo’ filmmakers dive again with ‘Finding Dory’

Story is king at Pixar Animation Studios. Whether a film introduces new characters or revisits old friends, it all starts with a story that needs to be told. And this special practice is also true with the production of “Finding Dory.” Watch the main trailer of “Finding Dory” below.

While the conclusion of the 2003 Oscar®-winning film “Finding Nemo” left filmmakers and fans perfectly satisfied—there was something that lingered in the depths of director Andrew Stanton’s mind, though it didn’t surface until a few years ago. “I realized that I was worried about Dory,” he says. “The idea of her short-term memory loss and how it affected her was unresolved. What if she got lost again? Would she be OK?”

Adds producer Lindsey Collins, “Dory seems so happy, but she was never really grounded until she met Marlin. Their happenstance meeting and subsequent friendship marked the first time since she was a kid that she had a family.”

Family is a key theme in “Finding Dory.” “We learn when we first meet Dory that she can’t remember where she’s from,” says Stanton. “But she must have a family. As she said, ‘Where are they?’ – Her confusion got a laugh, but there’s a sad truth to that. I knew there was a story worth telling.”

According to Stanton, the story crew initially showcased Dory as lighthearted, bubbly and funny—attributes that certainly apply to the character, but left her lacking depth. “She seemed a little two-dimensional,” says the director. “I realized that even though I had her full backstory in my head, nobody else did—including the audience. Everyone walked away from ‘Nemo’ with fond memories of how funny she is. But I always saw that as a mask. I realized we’d have to fill in the audience about what happened to her when she was young.”

The story picks up a year after Dory and Marlin journeyed across the ocean to find Nemo. A massive stingray migration cruises through their neighborhood, triggering Dory’s memory. “The experience is viscerally similar to an event that separated her from her parents so long ago,” says Stanton. “She’s flooded with memories and suddenly very motivated to track down her family.”

In an effort to maintain Dory’s drive to find her family, filmmakers had to first understand her memory issues. Says Collins, “While Dory forgets details in her day-to-day life—like Nemo’s name—her emotional memory is fine—she knows she loves Nemo and Marlin. And the love she has for her parents has been with her all along.”

According to co-director Angus MacLane, the memory flash marks the beginning of a new adventure. “It kicks off a quest—both internally and externally—to try to find her family,” he says. “But Dory feels that she can’t do it on her own, so she talks her newfound family—Marlin and Nemo—into coming along.”

“Finding Dory” features an all-star voice cast, welcoming Ellen DeGeneres and Albert Brooks back to the sea as favorite fish Dory and Marlin. Ed O’Neill lends his voice to “septopus” Hank, Kaitlin Olson voices whale shark Destiny, and Ty Burrell gives voice to beluga whale Bailey. Portraying Dory’s parents Charlie and Jenny are Eugene Levy and Diane Keaton. And 12-year-old Hayden Rolence steps in to help bring Nemo to life.
It is directed by Stanton (“Finding Nemo,” “WALL•E”) and co-directed by Angus MacLane (“Toy Story OF TERROR!”), the film is produced by Collins (co-producer “WALL•E”) and executive produced by John Lasseter. With music by veteran composer and long-time Stanton collaborator Thomas Newman (“Bridge of Spies,” “WALL•E,” “Finding Nemo”).

Disney•Pixar’s “Finding Dory” swims into Philippine theaters June 15, 2016 as distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures International through Columbia Pictures.

Follow the official social media accounts of Disney in the Philippines, namely, (FB) WaltDisneyStudiosPH, (Twitter) @disneystudiosph and (Instagram) @waltdisneystudiosph and use the hashtag #FindingDoryPH.

Characters go deep in Disney-Pixar’s animated film ‘Finding Dory’

“Finding Nemo’s” Dory, Marlin and Nemo embark on a new adventure—this time to the California coastline—on an uncertain search for the family Dory thinks she left behind, in Disney-Pixar’s “Finding Dory.”

Their journey leads them to the Marine Life Institute, where they meet a diverse array of sea creatures. “It really is a whole new chapter this time,” says director Andrew Stanton. Meet the line-up below!

Dory is a bright blue tang with a sunny personality. She suffers from short-term memory loss, which normally doesn’t upset her upbeat attitude—until she realizes she’s forgotten something big: her family. She’s found a new family in Marlin and Nemo, but she’s haunted by the belief that someone out there is looking for her. Dory may have trouble recalling exactly what—or who—she’s searching for, but she won’t give up until she uncovers her past and discovers something else along the way: self-acceptance.

Marlin may have traveled across the ocean once, but that doesn’t mean he wants to do it again. So he doesn’t exactly jump at the opportunity to accompany Dory on a mission to the California coast to track down her family. Marlin, of course, knows how it feels to lose family, and it was Dory who helped him find Nemo not so long ago. The clownfish may not be funny, but he’s loyal—he realizes he has no choice but to pack up his nervous energy and skepticism and embark on yet another adventure, this time to help his friend.

One year after his big overseas adventure, Nemo is back to being a normal kid: going to school and living on the coral reef with his dad and their blue tang neighbor, Dory. His harrowing adventure abroad doesn’t seem to have sapped his spirit. In fact, when Dory remembers pieces of her past and longs to take off on an ambitious ocean trek to find her family, Nemo is the first to offer his help. He may be a young clownfish with a lucky fin, but Nemo wholeheartedly believes in Dory. After all, he understands what it’s like to be different.

Hank is an octopus. Actually, he’s a “septopus”: he lost a tentacle—along with his sense of humor—somewhere along the way. But Hank is just as competent as his eight-armed peers. An accomplished escape artist with camouflaging capabilities to boot, Hank is the first to greet Dory when she finds herself in the Marine Life Institute. But make no mistake: he’s not looking for a friend. Hank is after one thing—a ticket on a transport truck to a cozy Cleveland facility where he’ll be able to enjoy a peaceful life of solitude.

Destiny may be a clumsy swimmer, but she has a big heart. She has a big everything, actually—whale sharks are the biggest fish in the sea. Destiny resides in the Marine Life Institute, where one day an oddly familiar blue tang named Dory falls into her pool. Destiny is admittedly embarrassed by her obvious lack of grace, a product of poor eyesight, but Dory thinks she swims beautifully. And Dory is delighted to learn that her supersized friend speaks whale, too.

Bailey is the Marine Life Institute’s resident beluga whale who is convinced his biological sonar skills are on the fritz. The good news—or bad news, depending on who you ask—is that doctors at the MLI can’t seem to find anything wrong with him. Bailey’s flair for the dramatic never ceases to push his neighbor’s buttons: whale shark Destiny can’t seem to get through to him, no matter how hard she tries. Maybe he’ll listen to new friend Dory, who seems to be full of crazy ideas.

Jenny and Charlie would do anything for their only child, Dory. They celebrate and protect her, striving to arm her with the skills she’ll need to navigate the world with a faulty memory. Jenny may appear cheerful and a little flighty—but she’s a protective mother and a smart role model. Charlie likes to joke around, but nothing is more important to him than teaching his memory-challenged daughter how to survive.

Opening across the Philippines on June 15, 2016 “Finding Dory” is distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures International through Columbia Pictures.

Follow the official social media accounts of Disney in the Philippines, namely, (FB) WaltDisneyStudiosPH, (Twitter) @disneystudiosph and (Instagram) @waltdisneystudiosph and use the hashtag #FindingDoryPH.

Discover magic within your flaws in comedy adventure ‘Finding Dory’

Disney•Pixar’s new comedy adventure “Finding Dory” welcomes back to the big screen everyone’s favorite forgetful blue tang Dory, who is living happily in the reef with Nemo and Marlin. When Dory suddenly remembers that she has a family out there who may be looking for her, she recruits Marlin and Nemo for a life-changing adventure across the ocean to California’s prestigious Marine Life Institute (MLI), a rehabilitation center and aquarium.

In the effort to find her mom and dad, Dory enlists the help of three of the MLI’s most intriguing residents: Hank, a cantankerous octopus who frequently gives employees the slip; Bailey, a beluga whale who is convinced his biological sonar skills are on the fritz; and Destiny, a nearsighted whale shark.

Deftly navigating the complex innerworkings of the MLI, Dory and her friends discover the magic within their flaws, friendships and family.

Filmmakers were eager to answer questions about Dory’s past. “She has that natural desire to know who she is and where she comes from,” says director Andrew Stanton. “I always had ideas about Dory’s backstory, and we decided the time had come to explore that with her.”

“Dory’s short-term memory loss, while a source of comedy before, has very real consequences for her,” says producer Lindsey Collins. “She spent a lot of time alone before she met Marlin. She’s always upbeat and perky, but deep down she’s afraid of what might happen if she gets lost again. While she struggles to deal with her shortcomings—she has no problem accepting everyone she encounters. She doesn’t even realize that she’s surrounded by characters with their own hurdles to overcome.”

“The story is really about Dory finding herself—in every way,” adds Stanton. “She’s compelling and vulnerable and has yet to recognize her own superpower.”

“Finding Dory” features an all-star voice cast, welcoming Ellen DeGeneres and Albert Brooks back to the sea as favorite fish Dory and Marlin. Ed O’Neill lends his voice to “septopus” Hank, Kaitlin Olson voices whale shark Destiny, and Ty Burrell gives voice to beluga whale Bailey. Portraying Dory’s parents Charlie and Jenny are Eugene Levy and Diane Keaton. And 12-year-old Hayden Rolence steps in to help bring Nemo to life.

Directed by Stanton (“Finding Nemo,” “WALL•E”) and co-directed by Angus MacLane (“Toy Story OF TERROR!”), the film is produced by Collins (co-producer “WALL•E”) and executive produced by John Lasseter, with music by veteran composer and long-time Stanton collaborator Thomas Newman (“Bridge of Spies,” “WALL•E,” “Finding Nemo”),.

Disney•Pixar’s “Finding Dory” swims into Philippine theaters June 15, 2016.

“Finding Dory is distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures International through Columbia Pictures. Follow the official social media accounts of Disney in the Philippines, namely, (FB) WaltDisneyStudiosPH, (Twitter) @disneystudiosph and (Instagram) @waltdisneystudiosph.

WATCH: New ‘Finding Dory’ trailer reveals her destiny

Disney-Pixar has just reeled-off the new trailer for its upcoming comedy adventure “Finding Dory,” and in the process revealed the blue tang’s destiny… or make it Destiny – Dory’s long-lost whale shark friend who has an exciting story to tell. The trailer premiered at The Ellen Show of “Finding Dory” lead voice star Ellen DeGeneres. View the trailer below.

Directed by “Finding Nemo” helmer Andrew Stanton, the film reunites Dory with friends Nemo and Marlin on a search for answers about her past. What can she remember? Who are her parents? And where did she learn to speak Whale?

Ellen DeGeneres returns to voice everyone’s favorite forgetful blue tang. Joining her in the voice cast are Ed O’Neill as Hank, a cantankerous octopus; Ty Burrell as Bailey, a misguided beluga whale; and Kaitlin Olson as Destiny, a kind-hearted whale shark.

“Finding Dory” also features the voices of Albert Brooks, Diane Keaton and Eugene Levy.

Opening across the Philippines on June 15, 2016, “Finding Dory” is distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures International through Columbia Pictures.

Follow the official social media accounts of Disney in the Philippines, namely, (FB) WaltDisneyStudiosPH, (Twitter) @disneystudiosph and (Instagram) @waltdisneystudiosph and use the hashtag #FindingDoryPH.